Dr Peter Lovatt

Dance
Psychologist

On this page you'll find a set of abstracts on Dance and Parkinson's disease. I've included a link to the Scopus entry or the paper. 

I've also included a short podcast of some the abstracts, which end with a few positive and negative thoughts about the paper.

Hulbert, S., Ashburn, A., Roberts, L., Verheyden, G. (2017). Dance for Parkinson's—The effects on whole body co-ordination during turning around. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 32, pp. 91-97. DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2017.03.012


https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85018297387&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2017.03.012&partnerID=40&md5=07de2db9bd9af615929201ce1ce81aa

 

ABSTRACT: Objective To investigate the effects of ballroom and Latin American dancing classes on turning in people with Parkinson's. Design This study employed a randomised, controlled, experimental design. Setting Dance classes were performed in a community dance centre in Southern England and all assessments took place a gait laboratory. Participants Twenty-seven people with mild-moderate Parkinson's participated. Intervention Participants were randomly allocated to receive either 20, 1-h dancing classes over 10 weeks (n = 15), or a ‘usual care’ control group (n = 12). Main outcome measure Twelve, 180° on-the-spot turns to the predicted/un-predicted and preferred/un-preferred direction were analysed for each participant, using 3-dimensional motion analysis before and after the intervention period, alongside clinical measures. Results Movement of the head, pelvis, and feet during turning in people with Parkinson's are affected by dancing with tighter coupling of body segments. Significant 4-way interactions between the groups, over time and turn style, with longer latency of the head (p = 0.008) and greater rotation in the pelvis (p = 0.036), alongside a trend of slower movement of the first (p = 0.063) and second (p = 0.081) foot in controls were shown, with minimal change in dancers. All interactions were affected by the type of turn. No significant differences were found in the centre of mass displacement, turn time or clinical measures. Conclusion Those who danced were better able to coordinate their axial and perpendicular segments and surprisingly became more ‘en bloc’ in their turning behaviour, suggesting this may be a beneficial adaptation, rather than a maladaptive result of Parkinson's, as previously suggested. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

Hulbert et al 2017 v2
0:00/4:07

Bognar, S., DeFaria, A.M., O’Dwyer, C., Pankiw, E., Simic Bogler, J., Teixeira, S., Nyhof-Young, J., Evans, C. (2017). More than just dancing: experiences of people with Parkinson’s disease in a therapeutic dance program. Disability and Rehabilitation, 39 (11), pp. 1073-1078.

DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2016.1175037


https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84969756524&doi=10.1080%2f09638288.2016.1175037&partnerID=40&md5=acddd6683d009159fbefe254654e4abe

 

ABSTRACT: Purpose: To understand why individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) participate in a community-based therapeutic dance program and to explore its influence on perceived physical, social and emotional well-being of participants. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was employed using one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Individuals with PD who participated in the Dancing with Parkinson’s program were recruited from two locations. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, de-identified and then placed into NVivo 10 software for analysis. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive analysis method to generate a coding scheme. Group discussion facilitated development of overarching themes. Results: Ten participants’ responses revealed that the dance program allows for self-improvement and regaining identity through disease self-management. Positive influences of socialization arose through the class, decreasing isolation and improving quality of life. Participants communicate through music and dance to enhance connection with others. Conclusions: Dancing with Parkinson’s classes allow for re-development of the social self, which can increase sense of enjoyment in life. Dance programs provide opportunities for social interaction, non-verbal communication and self-improvement, reestablishing self-identity and a sense of usefulness. This study provides unique insight into the experience of participating in a dance program from the perspective of individuals with PD.Implications for rehabilitation Dance is emerging as a strategy to address the physical and psychosocial effects of Parkinson’s disease (PD), but little is known regarding participants’ perceptions of community-based therapeutic dance programs for PD. This study found that Dancing with Parkinson’s (DWP) facilitated an improvement in social participation, resulting in decreased isolation and improved quality of life. Participation in the DWP program can facilitate a positive change in perspective and attitude toward a PD diagnosis, thereby increasing feelings of self-efficacy and improving self-management of the disease. Participants of this study emphasized the multifaceted benefits of DWP, suggesting that it has great potential for addressing not only the physical challenges, but also the cognitive and emotional challenges associated with PD. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

Bognar et al 2017 read by Peter Lovatt
0:00/4:16

Iuliano, J.E., Lutrick, K., Maez, P., Nacim, E., Reinschmidt, K.

Dance for Your Health: Exploring Social Latin Dancing for Community Health Promotion

(2017) American Journal of Health Education, 48 (3), pp. 142-145.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85014591759&doi=10.1080%2f19325037.2017.1292875&partnerID=40&md5=e7a01a4eaa985a0137618f6feb6761e3

 

DOI: 10.1080/19325037.2017.1292875

ABSTRACT: The goal of Dance for Your Health was to explore the relationship between social Latin dance and health as described by members of the Tucson social Latin dance community. Social Latin dance was selected because of the variety of dances, cultural relevance and popularity in Tucson, and the low-key, relaxed atmosphere. Dance has been prescribed to help manage diseases such as Parkinson’s; however, not much is known about the use of dance for health promotion. Through qualitative methodologies, the project focused on the role dance can play in health promotion and in creating community connections. The project explored personal stories and experiences on the broader impact of health, the meaning of community from the social Latin dancer’s point of view, thoughts on how social Latin dancing could be applied to help people in the community live healthier lives, and how to demystify social Latin dancing for people who are not currently dancing. © SHAPE America.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Note

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Prewitt, C.M., Charpentier, J.C., Brosky, J.A., Urbscheit, N.L.

Effects of Dance Classes on Cognition, Depression, and Self-Efficacy in Parkinson’s Disease

(2017) American Journal of Dance Therapy, pp. 1-16. Article in Press.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85014512545&doi=10.1007%2fs10465-017-9242-8&partnerID=40&md5=d3c602fae66be827508258874e62176e

 

DOI: 10.1007/s10465-017-9242-8

ABSTRACT: Executive function is an area of cognition commonly impaired in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Deficits often result in poor planning, slow reactions, and reduced initiative. Reduced physical function is also associated with PD but studies indicated that it can significantly improve through dance (Earhart, 2009; Hackney et al., 2007a, b). Dance may provide some positive effect on executive function but there’s little research investigating the effects of dance on cognitive symptoms of PD. The objective of this study was to determine whether executive function improves in individuals with PD following a dance program. Three different executive function measures (semantic fluency, dice, and fist-edge-palm) were assessed before and after an 8-week dance class that met twice a week. All measures were from the scales for outcomes in Parkinson’s disease-cognition (SCOPA-COG). The fist-edge-palm measure was also assessed before and after one single class. Six individuals with PD and between 62 and 87 years of age participated in the study. Results showed no significant changes in any of the three executive function tests administered before and after the 8-week dance program. However, the fist-edge-palm measure given before and after a single class significantly improved (p = 0.02). This suggests that therapeutic dance may specifically improve the executive function domain of cognition, particularly when connected to physical movement. This finding also suggests that participating in dance class on a daily short-term basis can improve executive function. If this effect is consistent, dance programs could improve short-term executive function in individuals with PD. © 2017 American Dance Therapy Association

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article in Press

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Butt, C.A.

"move your arm like a swan" dance for pd demedicalizes Parkinson disease

(2017) JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, 317 (4), pp. 342-343.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85011841909&doi=10.1001%2fjama.2016.21033&partnerID=40&md5=6e72fd345866b4cdb4be034acca97503

 

DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.21033

DOCUMENT TYPE: Short Survey

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Abbasi, J.

Augmented reality takes Parkinson disease dance therapy out of the classroom

(2017) JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, 317 (4), pp. 346-348.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85011866981&doi=10.1001%2fjama.2016.18122&partnerID=40&md5=be89d964bae9afee681440804ccd952a

 

DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.18122

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

De Natale, E.R., Paulus, K.S., Aiello, E., Sanna, B., Manca, A., Sotgiu, G., Leali, P.T., Deriu, F.

Dance therapy improves motor and cognitive functions in patients with Parkinson's disease

(2017) NeuroRehabilitation, 40 (1), pp. 141-144.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85015090991&doi=10.3233%2fNRE-161399&partnerID=40&md5=71b30d0e0f9215a83458d0c9ceb0234e

 

DOI: 10.3233/NRE-161399

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of Dance Therapy (DT) and Traditional Rehabilitation (TR) on both motor and cognitive domains in Parkinson's Disease patients (PD) with postural instability. METHODS: Sixteen PD patients with recent history of falls were divided in two groups (Dance Therapy, DT and Traditional Rehabilitation, TR); nine patients received 1-hour DT classes twice per week, completing 20 lessons within 10 weeks; seven patients received a similar cycle of 20 group sessions of 60 minutes TR. Motor (Berg Balance Scale - BBS, Gait Dynamic Index - GDI, Timed Up and Go Test - TUG, 4 Square-Step Test - 4SST, 6-Minute Walking Test - 6MWT) and cognitive measures (Frontal Assessment Battery - FAB, Trail Making Test A & B - TMT A&B, Stroop Test) were tested at baseline, after the treatment completion and after 8-week follow-up. RESULTS: In the DT group, but not in the TR group, motor and cognitive outcomes significantly improved after treatment and retained after follow-up. Significant changes were found for 6MWT (p=0.028), TUG (p=0.007), TMT-A (p=0.014) and TMT-B (p=0.036). CONCLUSIONS: DT is an unconventional physical therapy for PD patients which effectively impacts on motor (endurance and risk of falls) and non-motor functions (executive functions). © 2017 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Kwok, J.Y.Y., Choi, K.C., Chan, H.Y.L.

Effects of mind–body exercises on the physiological and psychosocial well-being of individuals with Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

(2016) Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 29, pp. 121-131.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84989211445&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2016.09.016&partnerID=40&md5=51b014c3ec190403f010d13b94946a3e

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.09.016

ABSTRACT: Objectives The effects of mind–body exercises on individuals with chronic illnesses have attracted increasing attention. However, little effort had been made to systematically review the effects of these mind–body exercises on individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). This review aimed to appraise the current evidence of the effects of mind–body exercises on the physiological and psychological outcomes for the PD population. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Data sources Four English databases, namely, the EMBASE, Ovid Medline, Psych Info, and Cochrane Library, were searched on January 2016. Review methods Studies involving participants with idiopathic PD were included if mind–body exercises were applied and compared with a non-exercise control to improve physiological and psychosocial well-being. The Effective Public Health Practice Project quality assessment tool was used for quality appraisal. RevMan 5.3 was employed to perform this meta-analysis. A subgroup analysis regarding the types and the dose of intervention was conducted to explore the sources of heterogeneity. Results Ten studies met the inclusion criteria for quality appraisal. The overall methodological rating of these studies indicated that one study was strong; five studies were moderate; and four studies were weak. Nine articles comprising five Tai Chi, two yoga, and two dance studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results of this review showed that mind–body exercises had a large, significant beneficial effect in motor symptoms in terms of UPDRS III for people with mild to moderate PD [SMD = −0.91, 95% CI (−1.37, −0.45), p < 0.05]. Significant subgroup differences were found among various types of mind–body exercises (p = 0.001). Yoga demonstrated the largest and most significant beneficial effect in reducing UPDRS III scores [SMD = −2.35, 95% CI (−3.21, −1.50), p < 0.01]. The pooled meta-analysis results showed that mind–body exercises had a large, significant effect in improving postural instability in terms of the Berg Balance Scale [SMD = 1.48, 95% CI (0.91, 2.06), p < 0.01] and Timed Up and Go test [SMD = −0.97, 95% CI (−1.46, −0.47), p < 0.01] and moderate, significant effect in improving functional mobility in terms of the Six-minute Walk test [SMD = 0.78, 95% CI (0.35, 1.21), p < 0.05]. Conclusions This review found that mind–body exercises demonstrated immediate moderate to large beneficial effects on motor symptoms, postural instability, and functional mobility among individuals with mild to moderate PD. However, the effects of mind–body exercises on psychosocial well-being had not been amply investigated, especially for yoga intervention. Future research should address the psychosocial effects of mind–body exercises on the PD population. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Bienkiewicz, M.M.N., Craig, C.

Editorial: Sound, Music, and movement in parkinson's disease

(2016) Frontiers in Neurology, 7 (NOV), art. no. 216, .

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85006379888&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2016.00216&partnerID=40&md5=0a64832fe7783e3c547c7054465b4d8b

 

DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2016.00216

DOCUMENT TYPE: Editorial

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Lossing, A., Moore, M., Zuhl, M.

Dance as a treatment for neurological disorders

(2016) Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy, pp. 1-15. Article in Press.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84997693809&doi=10.1080%2f17432979.2016.1260055&partnerID=40&md5=30e4e07e29047334a5b9758709f36d51

 

DOI: 10.1080/17432979.2016.1260055

ABSTRACT: Dance has been explored as a therapeutic intervention because of its unique combination of exercise, music and cognitive engagement. Dance therapy is a specific form of dance-based treatment that focuses on how movement correlates with psychological aspects such as self-awareness, expression and coordination, which culminate in a mind–body treatment. In recent years, dance-based programmes have been used as an intervention to improve symptoms of neurological diseases/disorders. Positive results have been shown for patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease, dementia and depression. The neurological adaptations such as improved neural activity and neurogenesis are induced by the combination of coordinated movement strategies, exercise, musical arrangements and social interactions (partnering). With the continued growth of dance therapy, the purpose of this review is to explain the recently proposed theories of how neural changes are mediated through dance, and discuss the positive effects on those suffering from neurological disorders. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article in Press

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Ventura, M.I., Barnes, D.E., Ross, J.M., Lanni, K.E., Sigvardt, K.A., Disbrow, E.A.

A pilot study to evaluate multi-dimensional effects of dance for people with Parkinson's disease

(2016) Contemporary Clinical Trials, 51, pp. 50-55. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84994899440&doi=10.1016%2fj.cct.2016.10.001&partnerID=40&md5=c362bd87c8b1eb9b97651eb45ce3fc95

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.cct.2016.10.001

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with deficits in motor, cognitive, and emotion/quality of life (QOL) domains, yet most pharmacologic and behavioral interventions focus only on motor function. Our goal was to perform a pilot study of Dance for Parkinson's—a community-based program that is growing in popularity—in order to compare effect sizes across multiple outcomes and to inform selection of primary and secondary outcomes for a larger trial. Study participants were people with PD who self-enrolled in either Dance for Parkinson's classes (intervention group, N = 8) or PD support groups (control group, N = 7). Assessments of motor function (Timed-Up-and-Go, Gait Speed, Standing Balance Test), cognitive function (Test of Everyday Attention, Verbal Fluency, Alternate Uses, Digit Span Forward and Backward), and emotion/QOL (Geriatric Depression Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale-International, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (total score and Activities of Daily Living subscale)) were performed in both groups at baseline and follow-up. Standardized effect sizes were calculated within each group and between groups for all 12 measures. Effect sizes were positive (suggesting improvement) for all 12 measures within the intervention group and 7 of 12 measures within the control group. The largest between-group differences were observed for the Test of Everyday Attention (a measure of cognitive switching), gait speed and falls efficacy. Our findings suggest that dance has potential to improve multiple outcomes in people with PD. Future trials should consider co-primary outcomes given potential benefits in motor, cognitive and emotion/QOL domains. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Bearss, K.A., McDonald, K.C., Bar, R.J., DeSouza, J.F.X.

Improvements in balance and gait speed after a 12 week dance intervention for Parkinson's disease

(2016) Advances in Integrative Medicine, . Article in Press.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85017531954&doi=10.1016%2fj.aimed.2017.02.002&partnerID=40&md5=ce532dde0ef18762455d987a91d6e9a5

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.aimed.2017.02.002

ABSTRACT: Preliminary research (Westheimer, Heiberger et al., Houston and McGill, Mandelbaum and Lo, Volpe et al., Westheimer et al. [2-7]) suggests dance is beneficial for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and can serve to compliment traditional medical treatments. There are many types of dance classes (Houston and McGill, Mandelbaum and Lo, Volpe et al. [4-6]) however, research on Dance for PD® (DfPD®) model has shown rapid growth in participant attendance and interest over time (Westheimer, Heiberger et al. [2,3]). In addition, unlike other studies where the description of the dance program has been rather vague, the DfPD® model has clear principles and a specific structure. The DfPD® model was developed in collaboration with the Brooklyn Parkinson Group and Mark Morris Dance Group, these dance classes are specifically designed to address symptom-specific concerns relating to PD. For researchers, this model allows easier replication to examine effects than a dance program that is not widely disseminated or as specific and the DfPD® model was implemented within this study for these reasons. What remains unknown, is the specific length of dance intervention required, measured in weeks and hours, until improvements are seen in motor impairments and quality of life (QoL) in PD. Objective: We aimed to replicate and extend previous findings (Westheimer, Heiberger et al. [2,3]) where enhancements were shown on short-term motor (1-day) (Heiberger et al. [3]) and quality of life using the DfPD® model. Here we conducted a 12-week pilot study using the DfPD® model, where these enhancements were observed in 34% less dance intervention duration within this model (15h), than the other two aforementioned studies (8-months3 &amp; 17-months2). Design: In this quasi-experimental, non-controlled study, 9 participants completed 2 motor and QoL questionnaires before and after the second and twelfth class at DfPD®. Results: Results indicated motor improvements for both balance and gait in short-term (1-day) and long-term (12-weeks). No improvements in QoL were observed. Conclusions: Participation in DfPD® model dance classes, improved motor symptoms in both short (1-day) and long-term (12-week) durations. Overall, QoL did not change from the second to twelfth week. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article in Press

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Zafar, M., Bozzorg, A., Hackney, M.E.

Adapted Tango improves aspects of participation in older adults versus individuals with Parkinson’s disease

(2016) Disability and Rehabilitation, pp. 1-8. Article in Press.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84992035835&doi=10.1080%2f09638288.2016.1226405&partnerID=40&md5=b208255dee46e52dfe1f0ca3d7aac4cf

 

DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2016.1226405

ABSTRACT: Purpose: Our aims were to determine (1) the impact of aging versus combined aging and disease on participation and (2) participation before and after a 12-week, Adapted Tango dance intervention (AT) in older adults with and without Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods: Participant responses to open and closed-ended questions on the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire (IPA) were recorded before, one-week-after, and three-months after 20 lessons of AT. Twenty-five older individuals with PD and 63 older adults without PD were initially enrolled and assessed, and 44 older adults and 22 individuals with PD finished the program with post-testing. Results: Thematic analysis revealed major themes of difficulty with mobility, transportation and financial management, feelings of being forced to limit activities, and interest in work or volunteering for both groups at baseline and post-test. At post-test, additional emphasis on resilience in the face of challenges was noted. No differences were noted between groups on the IPA subscales at baseline. Quantitative analysis with a 2 (group) × 3 (time) MANOVA revealed a main effect of time (p < 0.001), with improved Social Life (p < 0.001), marginally improved Autonomy Indoors (p = 0.073), and Family Role (p = 0.057). Conclusions: Adapted Tango improved aspects of participation for these cohorts of older adults with and without PD.Implications for RehabilitationBoth Parkinson’s disease and neurotypical aging can negatively impact participation in life’s activities in older adults.Adapted Tango is an alternative therapy that has improved quality of life and mobility in people with PD and older adults.Quantitative data show that Adapted Tango may improve some aspects of participation for older adults with and without PD.Open-ended responses reveal aging and combined aging and disease-related issues have a lasting impact upon participation. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article in Press

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Yassi, A., Spiegel, J.B., Lockhart, K., Fels, L., Boydell, K., Marcuse, J.

Ethics in Community-University-Artist Partnered Research: Tensions, Contradictions and Gaps Identified in an ‘Arts for Social Change’ Project

(2016) Journal of Academic Ethics, 14 (3), pp. 199-220.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84964018554&doi=10.1007%2fs10805-016-9257-7&partnerID=40&md5=6dc6d90e84296976fd7f20da41a3d2cd

 

DOI: 10.1007/s10805-016-9257-7

ABSTRACT: Academics from diverse disciplines are recognizing not only the procedural ethical issues involved in research, but also the complexity of everyday “micro” ethical issues that arise. While ethical guidelines are being developed for research in aboriginal populations and low-and-middle-income countries, multi-partnered research initiatives examining arts-based interventions to promote social change pose a unique set of ethical dilemmas not yet fully explored. Our research team, comprising health, education, and social scientists, critical theorists, artists and community-activists launched a five-year research partnership on arts-for-social change. Funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council in Canada and based in six universities, including over 40 community-based collaborators, and informed by five main field projects (circus with street youth, theatre by people with disabilities, dance for people with Parkinson’s disease, participatory theatre with refugees and artsinfused dialogue), we set out to synthesize existing knowledge and lessons we learned. We summarized these learnings into 12 key points for reflection, grouped into three categories: community-university partnership concerns (n = 3), dilemmas related to the arts (n = 5), and team issues (n = 4). In addition to addressing previous concerns outlined in the literature (e.g., related to consent, anonymity, dangerous emotional terrain, etc.), we identified power dynamics (visible and hidden) hindering meaningful participation of community partners and university-based teams that need to be addressed within a reflective critical framework of ethical practice. We present how our team has been addressing these issues, as examples of how such concerns could be approached in community-university partnerships in arts for social change. © 2016, The Author(s).

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Marchant, D.W.

Dancing with disease: A dancer's reflections on moving with people with Parkinson's and memory loss

(2016) Frontiers in Neurology, 7 (AUG), art. no. 137, .

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84988872596&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2016.00137&partnerID=40&md5=081b8ee00e7765a5aab37ea66d26d0ee

 

DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2016.00137

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Shanahan, J., Bhriain, O., Morris, M.E., Volpe, D., Clifford, A.M.

Irish set dancing classes for people with Parkinson's disease: The needs of participants and dance teachers

(2016) Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 27, pp. 12-17.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84964561046&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2016.04.001&partnerID=40&md5=218d4d724ab17555f2f0e66be5b5a63e

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.04.001

ABSTRACT: Objective: As the number of people diagnosed with Parkinson's disease increases, there is a need to develop initiatives that promote health and wellbeing and support self-management. Additionally, as exercise may slow physical decline, there is a need to develop methods that facilitate greater engagement with community-based exercise. The aim of this study is to examine the needs of (1) people with Parkinson's disease and (2) set dancing teachers to enable the development of participant-centred community set dance classes. Methods: A mixed methods study design was used. Two consensus group discussions using nominal group technique were held to (1) identify factors pertaining to the needs of people with Parkinson's disease from a set dance class and (2) the educational needs of set dancing teachers to enable them to teach set dancing to people with Parkinson's disease. Group discussions began with silent generation of ideas. A round-robin discussion and grouping of ideas into broader topic areas followed. Finally, participants ranked, by order of priority (1-5), the topic areas developed. Final data analysis involved summation of participants' ranking scores for each topic area. Results: Rich information on the needs of people with Parkinson's disease from a dance class and the educational guidance sought by set dancing teachers was gathered. Topic areas developed include "teaching method" for set dances and "class environment". Conclusion: Accessing community exercise programmes is important for this population. The results of this study will inform the development of an educational resource on Parkinson's disease for set dancing teachers. This resource may facilitate a larger number of teachers to establish sustainable community set dancing classes for people with Parkinson's disease. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Delextrat, A., Bateman, J., Esser, P., Targen, N., Dawes, H.

The potential benefits of Zumba Gold® in people with mild-to-moderate Parkinson's: Feasibility and effects of dance styles and number of sessions

(2016) Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 27, pp. 68-73.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84973922818&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2016.05.009&partnerID=40&md5=f4f445f270bf2733202e6bcb9054799b

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.05.009

ABSTRACT: Objectives: To assess the feasibility of Zumba Gold® in people with PD, and to investigate the effects of dance styles and number of sessions on activity levels and physiological load. Design: Repeated measure uncontrolled (single group) feasibility study. Setting: Eleven participants (age: 64.0 ± 8.1 years) with mild-to-moderate idiopathic PD (Hoehn &amp; Yahr stage &lt; 3.0) took part in a screening session, followed by six Zumba Gold® workouts each separated by one week, and a follow-up interview six months later. Main outcome measures: The main feasibility parameters measured were retention, compliance, and adverse events. Furthermore, during each Zumba Gold® session, physical activity levels were measured using tri-axial accelerometers, while physiological load was assessed by average heart rate (HRmean). A two-way ANOVA with repeated measures assessed the effects of dance styles and session number on activity level and HR. Results: 73% retention and 81% compliance were achieved, and no adverse events were recorded. Participants' enjoyment was high and 38% started Zumba Gold® classes in the community after intervention. HR values were similar between dance styles and within the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)'s recommendations in 50% of participants. Backwards steps reduced physiological load but improvements in activity levels between the first and last sessions show that steps could be learnt with time. Conclusions: Zumba Gold® is safe and enjoyable for people with PD. The excellent compliance and positive participants' feedback suggest the need for a larger-scale trial. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Aguiar, L.P.C., Da Rocha, P.A., Morris, M.

Therapeutic dancing for Parkinson's disease

(2016) International Journal of Gerontology, 10 (2), pp. 64-70. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84976417444&doi=10.1016%2fj.ijge.2016.02.002&partnerID=40&md5=7e2af765a503de506ecb4d6baaa9a253

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijge.2016.02.002

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic dancing has been advocated as an effective adjunct to conventional physical therapies for people living with Parkinson's disease (PD). This systematic review evaluates studies on the outcomes of different dance genres on mobility and quality of life in PD. We searched databases including CINHAL (1982-2015), Medline (1922-2015), Scopus (1996-2015), Web of Science (2002-2015), Embase (2007-2015), PEDro (1999-2015) and the Cochrane Library (1996-2015). The key words were: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson∗, Parkinsonism, dance, dance therapy, dance genres, safety, feasibility, and quality of life. Two independent investigators reviewed the texts. Only randomized controlled trials, quasirandomized controlled trials, and case series studies were included. There was emerging evidence that therapeutic dance can be safe and feasible for people with mild to moderately severe PD, with beneficial effects on walking, freezing of gait, and health related quality of life. Copyright © 2016, Taiwan Society of Geriatric Emergency & Critical Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Matthews, M.J., Yusuf, M., Doyle, C., Thompson, C.

Quadrupedal movement training improves markers of cognition and joint repositioning

(2016) Human Movement Science, 47, pp. 70-80.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84958225564&doi=10.1016%2fj.humov.2016.02.002&partnerID=40&md5=d65b5f2f194fe5c4d77978688ba602bb

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.humov.2016.02.002

ABSTRACT: Introduction: Exercise, and in particular balance and coordination related activities such as dance, appear to have positive effects on cognitive function, as well as neurodegenerative conditions such as dementia and Parkinson's disease. Quadrupedal gait training is a movement system requiring coordination of all four limbs that has previously been associated with cognitive development in children. There is currently little research into the effect of complex QDP movements on cognitive function in adults. Purpose: To determine the effects of a novel four-week quadrupedal gait training programme on markers of cognitive function and joint reposition sense in healthy adults. Methods: Twenty-two physically active sports science students (15 male and 7 female) were divided into two groups: a training group (TG) and a control group (CG). All participants completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) and were tested for joint reposition sense before and after a four-week intervention, during which time the TG completed a series of progressive and challenging quadrupedal movement training sessions. Results: Participants in the TG showed significant improvements in the WCST, with improvements in perseverative errors, non-perseverative errors, and conceptual level response. This improvement was not found in the CG. Joint reposition sense also improved for the TG, but only at 20 degrees of shoulder flexion. Conclusions: Performance of a novel, progressive, and challenging task, requiring the coordination of all 4 limbs, has a beneficial impact on cognitive flexibility, and in joint reposition sense, although only at the specific joint angle directly targeted by the training. The findings are consistent with other studies showing improvements in executive function and joint reposition sense following physical activity. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Yamano, K., Matsuda, N., Tanaka, K.

The ubiquitin signal and autophagy: An orchestrated dance leading to mitochondrial degradation

(2016) EMBO Reports, 17 (3), pp. 300-316. Cited 15 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84959481890&doi=10.15252%2fembr.201541486&partnerID=40&md5=e3f6530d7cfde4bcee50fb46fc5e8835

 

DOI: 10.15252/embr.201541486

ABSTRACT: The quality of mitochondria, essential organelles that produce ATP and regulate numerous metabolic pathways, must be strictly monitored to maintain cell homeostasis. The loss of mitochondrial quality control systems is acknowledged as a determinant for many types of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). The two gene products mutated in the autosomal recessive forms of familial early-onset PD, Parkin and PINK1, have been identified as essential proteins in the clearance of damaged mitochondria via an autophagic pathway termed mitophagy. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding how the mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase PINK1 and the E3 ligase Parkin work together through a novel stepwise cascade to identify and eliminate damaged mitochondria, a process that relies on the orchestrated crosstalk between ubiquitin/phosphorylation signaling and autophagy. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the detailed molecular mechanisms governing Parkin-/PINK1-mediated mitophagy and the evidences connecting Parkin/PINK1 function and mitochondrial clearance in neurons. The quality of mitochondria, essential organelles that produce ATP and regulate numerous metabolic pathways, must be strictly monitored to maintain cell homeostasis. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the detailed molecular mechanisms governing Parkin-/PINK1-mediated mitophagy and the evidences connecting Parkin/PINK1 function and mitochondrial clearance in neurons. © 2016 The Authors.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Batson, G., Hugenschmidt, C.E., Soriano, C.T.

Verbal auditory cueing of improvisational dance: A proposed method for training agency in Parkinson's disease

(2016) Frontiers in Neurology, 7 (FEB), art. no. 15, . Cited 2 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84962023223&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2016.00015&partnerID=40&md5=4a414890228a9fd0a5541911e84a85f5

 

DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2016.00015

ABSTRACT: Dance is a non-pharmacological intervention that helps maintain functional independence and quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease (PPD). Results from controlled studies on group-delivered dance for people with mild-to-moderate stage Parkinson's have shown statistically and clinically significant improvements in gait, balance, and psychosocial factors. Tested interventions include non-partnered dance forms (ballet and modern dance) and partnered (tango). In all of these dance forms, specific movement patterns initially are learned through repetition and performed in time-to-music. Once the basic steps are mastered, students may be encouraged to improvise on the learned steps as they perform them in rhythm with the music. Here, we summarize a method of teaching improvisational dance that advances previous reported benefits of dance for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The method relies primarily on improvisational verbal auditory cueing with less emphasis on directed movement instruction. This method builds on the idea that daily living requires flexible, adaptive responses to real-life challenges. In PD, movement disorders not only limit mobility but also impair spontaneity of thought and action. Dance improvisation demands open and immediate interpretation of verbally delivered movement cues, potentially fostering the formation of spontaneous movement strategies. Here, we present an introduction to a proposed method, detailing its methodological specifics, and pointing to future directions. The viewpoint advances an embodied cognitive approach that has eco-validity in helping PPD meet the changing demands of daily living. © 2016 Batson, Hugenschmidt and Soriano.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Schreiber, L.

The Dance

(2016) Neurology, 86 (6), pp. 580-581.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84957831319&doi=10.1212%2fWNL.0000000000002353&partnerID=40&md5=9f218ff1ee47e9f53ab377b496ff47ab

 

DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000002353

ABSTRACT: I lost my sense of smell about 15 years ago. I didn't think much of it then, even as a physician. But, I missed the scent of Cathy's skin, her hair, and perfume. Smell is part of the aphrodisiac of loving. I'm a hiker, and smell is part of the deep breaths you take in the forest. Coffee in the morning; the smell of Turkey roasting, my grandchildren's sweet smells. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Short Survey

SOURCE: Scopus

 

McKay, J.L., Ting, L.H., Hackney, M.E.

Balance, body motion, and muscle activity after high-volume short-term dance-based rehabilitation in persons with Parkinson disease: A pilot study

(2016) Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, 40 (4), pp. 257-268. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84984680096&doi=10.1097%2fNPT.0000000000000150&partnerID=40&md5=2d36de18d2d24b148fdd78fd4043c5d5

 

DOI: 10.1097/NPT.0000000000000150

ABSTRACT: Background and Purpose: The objectives of this pilot study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility and investigate the efficacy of a 3-week, high-volume (450 minutes per week) Adapted Tango intervention for community-dwelling individuals with mild-moderate Parkinson disease (PD) and (2) investigate the potential efficacy of Adapted Tango in modifying electromyographic (EMG) activity and center of body mass (CoM) displacement during automatic postural responses to support surface perturbations. Methods: Individuals with PD (n = 26) were recruited for highvolume Adapted Tango (15 lessons, 1.5 hour each over 3 weeks). Twenty participants were assessed with clinical balance and gait measures before and after the intervention. Nine participants were also assessed with support-surface translation perturbations. Results: Overall adherence to the intervention was 77%. At posttest, peak forward CoM displacement was reduced (4.0 ± 0.9 cm, pretest, vs 3.7 ± 1.1 cm, posttest; P = 0.03; Cohen's d = 0.30) and correlated to improvements on Berg Balance Scale (p = .0.68; P = 0.04) and Dynamic Gait Index (p =.0.75; P = 0.03). Overall antagonist onset time was delayed (27 ms; P = 0.02; d = 0.90) and duration was reduced (56 ms, .39%, P = 0.02; d = 0.45). Reductions in EMG magnitude were also observed (P < 0.05). Discussion and Conclusions: Following participation in Adapted Tango, changes in kinematic and some EMG measures of perturbation responses were observed in addition to improvements in clinical measures. We conclude that 3-week, high-volume Adapted Tango is feasible and represents a viable alternative to longer duration adapted dance programs. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy, APTA.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Koch, S.C., Mergheim, K., Raeke, J., Machado, C.B., Riegner, E., Nolden, J., Diermayr, G., von Moreau, D., Hillecke, T.K.

The embodied self in Parkinson's Disease: Feasibility of a single tango intervention for assessing changes in psychological health outcomes and aesthetic experience

(2016) Frontiers in Neuroscience, 10 (JUL), art. no. 287, . Cited 2 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84983027685&doi=10.3389%2ffnins.2016.00287&partnerID=40&md5=eba6a8cf4ed7cd4aa01fbe8abb5a7615

 

DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2016.00287

ABSTRACT: Background: Dance is an embodied activity with benefits for mobility, balance, and quality of life (QoL) of persons affected by Parkinson's Disease (PD). It is enjoyable and likely to support adherence to movement prescriptions. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of measuring changes in psychological outcomes, specifically well-being, body self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and experienced beauty after a single Argentine Tango intervention in a workshop format. To anchor experienced beauty in a theory, the article introduces a model of embodied aesthetics featuring active art-making as a central aspect of healing in arts-based interventions. Methods: In a single-group pre-post design, we tested the feasibility of measuring psychological changes of 34 PD patients from Southern Germany after an introductory workshop in Argentine Tango. They participated in a 90 min Tango for PD intervention and completed the Heidelberg State Inventory (HSI-24; (Koch et al., 2007)), the Body Self-Efficacy Scale (BSE; (Fuchs and Koch, 2014)) with a sub-dimension on aesthetic experience, and the Credibility-Expectancy Questionnaire (CEQ; (Devilly and Borkovec, 2000)) before and after the intervention. A subgroup completed the therapeutic factors of arts therapies-scale, a new measure to elaborate on the aesthetic experience. We analyzed pre-post-differences with a t-test for paired samples. Results and Discussion: The study supports the feasibility of measuring health-related psychological changes from a single Argentine Tango intervention for PD patients, as well as acceptance and appropriateness of the intervention for the patient group. After the tango intervention, well-being, body self-efficacy, and outcome expectancies increased. Participants also experienced an increase in beauty of their movements and other aesthetic aspects. We suspect that, in addition to the functional and psychological factors identified so far, the aesthetic experience in dance may be an important therapeutic factor mediating several outcomes of dance and other arts-based interventions. A controlled study for evidence-based testing of targeted variables can now follow to examine the new hypotheses. © 2016 Koch, Mergheim, Raeke, Machado, Riegner, Nolden, Diermayr, von Moreau and Hillecke.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Abbruzzese, G., Marchese, R., Avanzino, L., Pelosin, E.

Rehabilitation for Parkinson's disease: Current outlook and future challenges

(2016) Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, 22, pp. S60-S64. Cited 15 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84947869088&doi=10.1016%2fj.parkreldis.2015.09.005&partnerID=40&md5=22f9eb93ed2a695e3ae1cd1e995007ff

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2015.09.005

ABSTRACT: Rehabilitation is considered as an adjuvant to pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) to maximize functional ability and minimize secondary complications. Originally, approaches were based on empirical experience, but growing evidence suggests that exercise-dependent plasticity constitutes the main mechanism underlying the effects of physiotherapy. Exercise increases synaptic strength and influences neurotransmission, thus potentiating functional circuitry in PD. In addition, exercise is a pivotal element of motor learning. PD patients retain a sufficient capacity of motor learning, though learning rates and performance are reduced in comparison to normal controls. Recent meta-analyses demonstrated that rehabilitation could induce short-lasting, but clinically important benefits, particularly for gait and balance. However, the interventions are largely heterogeneous (stretching, muscle strengthening, balance, postural exercises, occupational therapy, cueing, treadmill training), and there is still no consensus about the optimal approach. Innovative techniques have been recently proposed: virtual reality and exergaming, motor imagery and action observation, robot-assisted physiotherapy and non-conventional therapies (e.g.: dance, martial arts). The rehabilitative program for PD should be "goal-based" (targeted to practicing and learning specific activities in the core areas), but a number of practice variables (intensity, specificity, complexity) need to be identified and the program should tailored to the individual patients' characteristics. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

McNeely, M.E., Duncan, R.P., Earhart, G.M.

Impacts of dance on non-motor symptoms, participation, and quality of life in Parkinson disease and healthy older adults

(2015) Maturitas, 82 (4), pp. 336-341. Cited 3 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84947870171&doi=10.1016%2fj.maturitas.2015.08.002&partnerID=40&md5=5dde7e9e8cee66896d55a73a1390018c

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.08.002

ABSTRACT: Evidence indicates exercise is beneficial for motor and non-motor function in older adults and people with chronic diseases including Parkinson disease (PD). Dance may be a relevant form of exercise in PD and older adults due to social factors and accessibility. People with PD experience motor and non-motor symptoms, but treatments, interventions, and assessments often focus more on motor symptoms. Similar non-motor symptoms also occur in older adults. While it is well-known that dance may improve motor outcomes, it is less clear how dance affects non-motor symptoms. This review aims to describe the effects of dance interventions on non-motor symptoms in older adults and PD, highlights limitations of the literature, and identifies opportunities for future research. Overall, intervention parameters, study designs, and outcome measures differ widely, limiting comparisons across studies. Results are mixed in both populations, but evidence supports the potential for dance to improve mood, cognition, and quality of life in PD and healthy older adults. Participation and non-motor symptoms like sleep disturbances, pain, and fatigue have not been measured in older adults. Additional well-designed studies comparing dance and exercise interventions are needed to clarify the effects of dance on non-motor function and establish recommendations for these populations. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Lötzke, D., Ostermann, T., Büssing, A.

Argentine tango in Parkinson disease - a systematic review and meta-analysis

(2015) BMC Neurology, 15 (1), art. no. 226, . Cited 7 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84959225344&doi=10.1186%2fs12883-015-0484-0&partnerID=40&md5=33581c5b6a0b89d2e4977b19a915db9f

 

DOI: 10.1186/s12883-015-0484-0

ABSTRACT: Background: Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with increasing motor and non-motor symptoms in advanced stages. In addition to conventional exercise therapy and drug treatment, Argentine Tango (AT) is discussed as an appropriate intervention for patients to improve physical functioning and health-related quality of life. This review aimed to summarize the current research results on the effectiveness of AT for individuals with PD. Methods: The global literature search with the search terms "(Parkinson OR Parkinson's disease) AND tango" was conducted in PubMED, AMED, CAMbase, and Google Scholar for publications in English and German. There were no limitations on the study design, year of publication, stage of disease, considered outcome or the age of participants. Results: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. These included 9 randomized-controlled trials, one non-randomized trial, two case studies and one uncontrolled pre-post study. Our meta-analysis revealed significant overall effects in favor of tango for motor severity measured with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale 3 (ES = -0.62, 95 % CI [-1.04, -0.21]), balance as measured with the Mini-BESTest (ES = 0.96 [0.60, 1.31]) or Berg Balance Scale (ES = 0.45 [0.01, 0.90]), and gait with the Timed Up and Go Test (ES = -46 [-0.72, -0.20]). However, gait as measured with a 6-Minute Walk Test did not demonstrate statistical significance (ES = 0.36 [-0.06, 0.77]). For freezing of gait, no significant effects were observed in favor of AT (ES = 0.16 [-62, 0.31]). Further, our systematic review revealed a tendency for positive effects on fatigue, activity participation and Parkinson-associated quality of life. A limitation of the studies is the small number of participants in each study (maximum 75). Moreover, most studies are from the same research groups, and only a few are from other researchers. Conclusions: Future studies should enroll more individuals and should also focus on long-term effects. In addition, future research should address more closely the effects of AT on personal relationships, the individual social network as well as on aspects of quality of life. © 2015 Lötzke et al.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Westheimer, O., McRae, C., Henchcliffe, C., Fesharaki, A., Glazman, S., Ene, H., Bodis-Wollner, I.

Dance for PD: a preliminary investigation of effects on motor function and quality of life among persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

(2015) Journal of Neural Transmission, 122 (9), pp. 1263-1270. Cited 6 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84939566167&doi=10.1007%2fs00702-015-1380-x&partnerID=40&md5=17f17be7c102efb8d9c18771baa22773

 

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-015-1380-x

ABSTRACT: In 2001, Dance for Parkinson’s disease (DfPD®) classes for persons with Parkinson’s disease and care partners were developed by Brooklyn Parkinson Group and Mark Morris Dance Group. A previous assessment suggested that individuals experience positive benefits from DfPD®. The current preliminary uncontrolled study investigated the effects of a dance intervention on several motor and quality of life aspects of PD following 16 sessions (8 weeks; 20 h) taught by professional dancers/teachers. A mixed methods design was used to determine the effects of the class. Assessment instruments administered at baseline and post-intervention included the Hoehn and Yahr, UPDRS (part III), Berg Balance Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and PDQ-39 and individual interviews after the last class. Hoehn and Yahr scores ranged from 1 to 4. UPDRS III total scores and sub scores of gait and tremor improved following the intervention (P &lt; 0.05). During interviews participants reported physical, emotional, and social benefits. Despite the diversity of baseline measures post-class interview results were consistently positive across the sample. Twelve of 14 subjects (mean age 66.2) with idiopathic PD completed the sessions. After 4 years, four participants regularly attended DfPD® classes. The low attrition rate and continued attendance suggest notable adherence to the DfPD® class. The importance of the results is both clinical and conceptual, highlighting the value of using both quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate the benefits of dance with PD. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Wien.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Bloem, B.R., de Vries, N.M., Ebersbach, G.

Nonpharmacological treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease

(2015) Movement Disorders, 30 (11), pp. 1504-1520. Cited 25 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84941600942&doi=10.1002%2fmds.26363&partnerID=40&md5=dff75aa9370ee29c413ee4410e425e13

 

DOI: 10.1002/mds.26363

ABSTRACT: Since 2013, a number of studies have enhanced the literature and have guided clinicians on viable treatment interventions outside of pharmacotherapy and surgery. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials and one large observational study on exercise and physiotherapy were published in this period. Four randomized controlled trials focused on dance interventions, eight on treatment of cognition and behavior, two on occupational therapy, and two on speech and language therapy (the latter two specifically addressed dysphagia). Three randomized controlled trials focused on multidisciplinary care models, one study on telemedicine, and four studies on alternative interventions, including music therapy and mindfulness. These studies attest to the marked interest in these therapeutic approaches and the increasing evidence base that places nonpharmacological treatments firmly within the integrated repertoire of treatment options in Parkinson's disease. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Noah, J.A., Ono, Y., Nomoto, Y., Shimada, S., Tachibana, A., Zhang, X., Bronner, S., Hirsch, J.

fMRI validation of fNIRS measurements during a naturalistic task

(2015) Journal of Visualized Experiments, 2015 (100), art. no. e52116, 10 p. Cited 5 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84941243558&doi=10.3791%2f52116&partnerID=40&md5=3370fda3567cbdd373638999457e1eb3

 

DOI: 10.3791/52116

ABSTRACT: We present a method to compare brain activity recorded with near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a dance video game task to that recorded in a reduced version of the task using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Recently, it has been shown that fNIRS can accurately record functional brain activities equivalent to those concurrently recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging for classic psychophysical tasks and simple finger tapping paradigms. However, an often quoted benefit of fNIRS is that the technique allows for studying neural mechanisms of complex, naturalistic behaviors that are not possible using the constrained environment of fMRI. Our goal was to extend the findings of previous studies that have shown high correlation between concurrently recorded fNIRS and fMRI signals to compare neural recordings obtained in fMRI procedures to those separately obtained in naturalistic fNIRS experiments. Specifically, we developed a modified version of the dance video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) to be compatible with both fMRI and fNIRS imaging procedures. In this methodology we explain the modifications to the software and hardware for compatibility with each technique as well as the scanning and calibration procedures used to obtain representative results. The results of the study show a task-related increase in oxyhemoglobin in both modalities and demonstrate that it is possible to replicate the findings of fMRI using fNIRS in a naturalistic task. This technique represents a methodology to compare fMRI imaging paradigms which utilize a reduced-world environment to fNIRS in closer approximation to naturalistic, full-body activities and behaviors. Further development of this technique may apply to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, late states of dementia, or those with magnetic susceptibility which are contraindicated for fMRI scanning. © 2015 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Chen, T.L., Bhattacharjee, T., McKay, J.L., Borinski, J.E., Hackney, M.E., Ting, L.H., Kemp, C.C.

Evaluation by expert dancers of a robot that performs partnered stepping via haptic interaction

(2015) PLoS ONE, 10 (5), art. no. e0125179, . Cited 5 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84930673325&doi=10.1371%2fjournal.pone.0125179&partnerID=40&md5=6b3afe444e05fddcd3601f21339cedb9

 

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0125179

ABSTRACT: Our long-term goal is to enable a robot to engage in partner dance for use in rehabilitation therapy, assessment, diagnosis, and scientific investigations of two-person whole-body motor coordination. Partner dance has been shown to improve balance and gait in people with Parkinson's disease and in older adults, which motivates our work. During partner dance, dance couples rely heavily on haptic interaction to convey motor intent such as speed and direction. In this paper, we investigate the potential for a wheeled mobile robot with a human-like upper-body to perform partnered stepping with people based on the forces applied to its end effectors. Blindfolded expert dancers (N=10) performed a forward/backward walking step to a recorded drum beat while holding the robot's end effectors. We varied the admittance gain of the robot's mobile base controller and the stiffness of the robot's arms. The robot followed the participants with low lag (M=224, SD=194 ms) across all trials. High admittance gain and high arm stiffness conditions resulted in significantly improved performance with respect to subjective and objective measures. Biomechanical measures such as the human hand to human sternum distance, center-of-mass of leader to center-of-mass of follower (CoM-CoM) distance, and interaction forces correlated with the expert dancers' subjective ratings of their interactions with the robot, which were internally consistent (Cronbach's α=0.92). In response to a final questionnaire, 1/10 expert dancers strongly agreed, 5/10 agreed, and 1/10 disagreed with the statement "The robot was a good follower." 2/10 strongly agreed, 3/10 agreed, and 2/10 disagreed with the statement "The robot was fun to dance with." The remaining participants were neutral with respect to these two questions. © 2015, Public Library of Science. All rights reserved. This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

McNeely, M.E., Mai, M.M., Duncan, R.P., Earhart, G.M.

Differential effects of tango versus dance for PD in Parkinson disease

(2015) Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 7 (DEC), art. no. 239, . Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84982746144&doi=10.3389%2ffnagi.2015.00239&partnerID=40&md5=0902beb26ce60db321554fa99b5eb530

 

DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00239

ABSTRACT: Over half of the general population does not achieve recommended daily levels of physical activity, and activity levels in people with Parkinson disease (PD) are lower than in healthy older adults. Dance can serve as an adjunct to traditional treatments to improve gait, balance, and quality of life in people with PD. This study directly compares a tango dance intervention and a dance intervention based on the Dance for PD model, which integrates multiple dance styles. Eleven people with PD participated in a community-based mixed styles dance intervention called Dance for Parkinson's (D4PD). Participants in the D4PD group were matched to participants in an ongoing community-based exercise study who participated in tango dance. The groups received 12 weeks of intervention, attending 1-h group classes twice a week. Participants were evaluated off anti-PD medication before and after intervention. Measures of balance, repeated sit-to-stand performance and endurance (mini-balance evaluation systems test, four square step test, five times sit to stand, 6-min walk time) improved from pre to post similarly in both groups. Motor sign severity (movement disorders society unified Parkinson disease rating scale motor subsection) and functional mobility (timed up and go) improved in the tango group and worsened in the D4PD group. Gait velocity was not affected by either intervention. Direct comparisons of different interventions are critical for developing optimal exercise interventions designed to specifically target motor impairments in PD. Tango dance interventions may preferentially improve mobility and motor signs in people with PD, compared to D4PD. © 2015 McNeely, Mai, Duncan and Earhart.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hashimoto, H., Takabatake, S., Miyaguchi, H., Nakanishi, H., Naitou, Y.

Effects of dance on motor functions, cognitive functions, and mental symptoms of Parkinson's disease: A quasi-randomized pilot trial

(2015) Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 23 (2), pp. 210-219. Cited 8 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84926419116&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2015.01.010&partnerID=40&md5=a3ebecb2e3ba0ca423d7c7ca53f067fc

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.01.010

ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine the effectiveness of dance on motor functions, cognitive functions, and mental symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Design: This study employed a quasi-randomised, between-group design. Setting: Dance, PD exercise, and all assessments were performed in community halls in different regions of Japan. Participants: Forty-six mild-moderate PD patients participated. Intervention: Six PD patient associations that agreed to participate in the study were randomly assigned to a dance group, PD exercise group, or non-intervention group. The dance and PD exercise groups performed one 60-min session per week for 12 weeks. Control group patients continued with their normal lives. All groups were assessed before and after the intervention. Main outcome measures: We used the Timed Up-and-Go Test (TUG) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) to assess motor function, the Frontal Assessment Battery at bedside (FAB) and Mental Rotation Task (MRT) to assess cognitive function, and the Apathy Scale (AS) and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) to assess mental symptoms of PD. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was used for general assessment of PD. Results: When comparing results before and after intervention, the dance group showed a large effect in TUG time (ES. = 0.65, p= 0.006), TUG step number (ES = 0.66, p= 0.005), BBS (ES = 0.75, p= 0.001), FAB (ES = 0.77, p= 0.001), MRT response time (ES = 0.79, p< 0.001), AS (ES = 0.78, p< 0.001), SDS (ES = 0.66, p= 0.006) and UPDRS (ES = 0.88, p< 0.001). Conclusions: Dance was effective in improving motor function, cognitive function, and mental symptoms in PD patients. General symptoms in PD also improved. Dance is an effective method for rehabilitation in PD patients. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

McNeely, M.E., Duncan, R.P., Earhart, G.M.

A comparison of dance interventions in people with Parkinson disease and older adults

(2015) Maturitas, 81 (1), pp. 10-16. Cited 7 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84928048236&doi=10.1016%2fj.maturitas.2015.02.007&partnerID=40&md5=e8004f37a476ece6b114c9392f84ea30

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.02.007

ABSTRACT: It is important for our aging population to remain active, particularly those with chronic diseases, like Parkinson disease (PD), which limit mobility. Recent studies in older adults and people with PD suggest dance interventions provide various motor benefits. The literature for dance in PD is growing, but many knowledge gaps remain, relative to what is known in older adults. The purpose of this review is to: (1) detail results of dance intervention studies in older adults and in PD, (2) describe limitations of dance research in these populations, and (3) identify directions for future study. Generally, a wide variety of dance styles have been investigated in older adults, while a more limited subset has been evaluated in PD. Measures vary widely across studies and a lack of standardized outcomes measures hinders cross-studies comparisons. Compared to the dance literature in older adults, there is a notable absence of evidence in the PD literature in outcome domains related to cardiovascular health, muscle strength, body composition, flexibility, and proprioception. As a whole, the dance literature supports substantial and wide-ranging benefits in both populations, but additional effort should be dedicated to well-designed comparative studies using standardized outcome measures to identify optimal treatment programs. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Shanahan, J., Morris, M.E., Bhriain, O.N., Saunders, J., Clifford, A.M.

Dance for people with Parkinson disease: What is the evidence telling us?

(2015) Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96 (1), pp. 141-153. Cited 21 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84919394270&doi=10.1016%2fj.apmr.2014.08.017&partnerID=40&md5=69b280626bf95eb5d806e3c8eecc8d13

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.08.017

ABSTRACT: Objectives: (1) To appraise and synthesize the literature on dance interventions for individuals with Parkinson disease (PD); (2) to provide information regarding the frequency, intensity, duration, and type of dance used in these programs; and (3) to inform the development of future studies evaluating dance interventions in this population.

Data Sources: Eight databases (MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature [CINAHL], the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database [AMED], SPORTDiscus, PubMed, PubMed Central, Sage, and ScienceDirect) were electronically searched in April 2014. The references lists from the included articles were also searched.

Study Selection: Studies retrieved during the literature search were reviewed by 2 reviewers independently. Suitable articles were identified by applying inclusion criteria.

Data Extraction: Data regarding participants and the frequency, intensity, duration, and type of dance form used were extracted. The effect that each dance program had on defined outcomes and the feasibility of each program were also reviewed.

Data Synthesis: Thirteen articles were identified. The quality of studies varied, and methodological limitations were evident in some. The evidence evaluated suggests that two 1-hour dance classes per week over 10 to 13 weeks may have beneficial effects on endurance, motor impairment, and balance.

Conclusions: Dance may be helpful for some people with PD. This article provides preliminary information to aid clinicians when implementing dance programs for people with PD. Higher-quality multicenter studies are needed to determine the effect of other dance genres and the optimal therapy volume and intensity. © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Lee, N.-Y., Lee, D.-K., Song, H.-S.

Effect of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living, And depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients

(2015) Journal of Physical Therapy Science, 27 (1), pp. 145-147. Cited 11 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84920872980&doi=10.1589%2fjpts.27.145&partnerID=40&md5=b2499fce0f8966f9c404dfb5b18fb1b0

 

DOI: 10.1589/jpts.27.145

ABSTRACT: [Purpose] In this study, we examined the effects of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living and depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients. [Subjects] Twenty patients were assigned either the experimental group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). All participants received 30 minutes of neurodevelopment treatment and 15 minutes of functional electrical stimulation 5 times per week for 6 weeks. The experimental group additionally performed 30 minutes of dance exercise. Balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status were assessed before and after the 6-week treatment period using the Berg balance scale, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The paired t-test was used to detect differences before and after treatment, and the independent t-test was used to detect differences between the treatment groups. [Results] The values for balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status significantly differed between before and after treatment in the experimental group, and significantly differed between the experimental group and control group. [Conclusion] Virtual reality dance exercise has a positive effect on balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients. © 2015 The Society of Physical Therapy Science. Published by IPEC Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Molloy, F., Keogh, J., Krampe, J., Guzmán, A.

Dance mobility: A somatic and dance programme for older adults in New Zealand

(2015) Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy, 10 (3), pp. 169-180. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84939776654&doi=10.1080%2f17432979.2015.1032353&partnerID=40&md5=c196c49b338846772651e6025f166950

 

DOI: 10.1080/17432979.2015.1032353

ABSTRACT: This article describes the significance of Dance Mobility™, a new community dance programme that follows a New Zealand partnership research project, designed for older adults with diverse motor skill levels and dance experiences. The programme includes high-functioning older adults, some with sensory or balance impairments and others with Parkinson's disease. We discuss the benefits and challenges of facilitating a once-weekly dance practice model and the ways the programme affects individuals sensorial states of well-being and awareness. Somatic practices are introduced as integral to Dance Mobility™ teaching methods and dance activities. We include observations and comparisons with dance embodiment theories, cross-disciplinary goals of gerontology and exercise science/rehabilitation research to debate benefits and limitations of dance for older adults, and adaptive methods of the Dance Mobility™ approach. Somatic research is needed to build evidence-based conclusions that advance older adults feelings of well-being and safeguard their motivations to continue moving freely. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Erratum: Dance for People with Parkinson Disease: What Is the Evidence Telling Us? (Arch Phys Med Rehabil (2015) 96 (141-53))

(2015) Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96 (10), p. 1931.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84943779904&doi=10.1016%2fj.apmr.2015.08.420&partnerID=40&md5=b8fc736553868f7379fc9a802def3060

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.08.420

DOCUMENT TYPE: Erratum

SOURCE: Scopus

 

de Dreu, M.J., Kwakkel, G., van Wegen, E.E.H.

Partnered dancing to improve mobility for people with parkinson's disease

(2015) Frontiers in Neuroscience, 9 (DEC), art. no. 444, .

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84954498042&doi=10.3389%2ffnins.2015.00444&partnerID=40&md5=4e56984e67ba539a3491b59fef2ea883

 

DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2015.00444

DOCUMENT TYPE: Note

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Sivvas, G., Batsiou, S., Vasoglou, Z., Filippou, D.-A.

Dance contribution in health promotion

(2015) Journal of Physical Education and Sport, 15 (3), art. no. 73, pp. 484-489. Cited 2 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84942788026&doi=10.7752%2fjpes.2015.03073&partnerID=40&md5=88297bd2dce02d25e5f61b1f07d49a80

 

DOI: 10.7752/jpes.2015.03073

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this research was to investigate if any form of dance can prove to be an asset of conservation or improvement of human health. The term “health”, is used to describe the physical mental and social well-being of the individuals. Through the review of literature of the last decade, which has been used as a method of data collection, 24 papers related to the subject were found. Although the majority of survey samples consisted of women and elderly people, men, children and teenagers also constituted considerable sample of many researches. Such surveys dealt with all kinds of dance and their effects in dancers’ health. Traditional dance forms (i.e. Greek, Turkish, Korean, Caribbean Islands) were the field of quest for nine researches, while ballroom dances (salsa, tango, waltz, and rumba) constituted the field of other seven. Aerobic, belly dance, Wu Tao dance and jazz were the field of the rest of the eight researches. Healthy people, but also others suffering from various diseases were involved in these studies. These diseases included breast cancer, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Parkinson, obesity, but also dementia, depression and people with hearing loss. From the study results of researches, it was found that dancing helps in many ways to preserve and improve human health, as far as physical health is concerned-as it maintained the physical state in good level-, but also concerning mental health-by minimizing stress and depression. Finally, social health also proved to be positively affectedas the factors that prevent an individual from socialization were reduced. © JPES.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Rios Romenets, S., Anang, J., Fereshtehnejad, S.-M., Pelletier, A., Postuma, R.

Tango for treatment of motor and non-motor manifestations in Parkinson's disease: A randomized control study

(2015) Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 23 (2), pp. 175-184. Cited 11 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84926418789&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2015.01.015&partnerID=40&md5=4379c849c691e868bde28cdb7297e8a9

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.01.015

ABSTRACT: Objective: To determine effects of Argentine tango on motor and non-motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Design: Randomized control trial. Participants: Forty patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Setting: Movement disorder clinic and dance studio. Intervention: Two randomized groups: group (N= 18) with 24 partnered tango classes, and control self-directed exercise group (N= 15). Main outcomes measures: The primary outcome was overall motor severity. Secondary outcomes included other motor measures, balance, cognition, fatigue, apathy, depression and quality of life. Results: On the primary intention-to-treat analysis there was no difference in motor severity between groups MDS-UPDRS-3 (1.6 vs.1.2-point reduction, p= 0.85). Patient-rated clinical global impression of change did not differ (p= 0.33), however examiner rating improved in favor of tango (p= 0.02). Mini-BESTest improved in the tango group compared to controls (0.7 ± 2.2 vs. -2.7 ± 5.9, p= 0.032). Among individual items, tango improved in both simple TUG time (-1.3 ± 1.6. s vs. 0.1 ± 2.3, p= 0.042) and TUG Dual Task score (0.4 ± 0.9 vs. -0.2 ± 0.4, p= 0.012), with borderline improvement in walk with pivot turns (0.2 ± 0.5 vs. -0.1 ± 0.5, p= 0.066). MoCa (0.4 ± 1.6 vs. -0.6 ± 1.5, p= 0.080) and FSS (-3.6 ± 10.5 vs. 2.5 ± 6.2, p= 0.057) showed a non-significant trend toward improvement in the tango group. Tango participants found the activity more enjoyable (p<. 0.001) and felt more "overall" treatment satisfaction (p< 0.001). We found no significant differences in other outcomes or adverse events. Conclusion: Argentine tango can improve balance, and functional mobility, and may have modest benefits upon cognition and fatigue in Parkinson's disease. These findings must be confirmed in longer-term trials explicitly powered for cognition and fatigue. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Shanahan, J., Morris, M.E., Bhriain, O.N., Volpe, D., Richardson, M., Clifford, A.M.

Is Irish set dancing feasible for people with Parkinson's disease in Ireland?

(2015) Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 21 (1), pp. 47-51. Cited 7 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84926420783&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctcp.2014.12.002&partnerID=40&md5=aaf18b834f06ad7fea613b82b9f1d437

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2014.12.002

ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate if community-based Irish set dancing is feasible in Irish adults with Parkinson's disease. Methods: Over an eight week period, ten participants attended one set dancing class per week and completed a home programme in parallel. Feasibility was assessed by monitoring adverse effects, participants' verbal feedback, compliance rates and feedback from an exit questionnaire. Participants were assessed using the Berg balance scale, 6-min walk test, UPDRS-3 and PDQ-39, before and after the intervention. Results: No adverse effects were detected. Attendance at classes was 86%. Compliance with the home programme was 67%. Findings from the exit questionnaire showed participants enjoyed participating and reported improvements in aspects of health including balance. Quality of life improved with the dance programme and there was a trend toward improvement on the UPDRS-3. Conclusion: These findings suggest community-based Irish set dancing is a feasible form of exercise that can positively influence quality of life. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Ashoori, A., Eagleman, D.M., Jankovic, J.

Effects of auditory rhythm and music on gait disturbances in Parkinson's disease

(2015) Frontiers in Neurology, 6 (NOV), art. no. 267, . Cited 4 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84951559907&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2015.00234&partnerID=40&md5=b31e0f32fb70442667e8a3a11c4a3137

 

DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2015.00234

ABSTRACT: Gait abnormalities, such as shuffling steps, start hesitation, and freezing, are common and often incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other parkinsonian disorders. Pharmacological and surgical approaches have only limited efficacy in treating these gait disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS), such as playing marching music and dance therapy, has been shown to be a safe, inexpensive, and an effective method in improving gait in PD patients. However, RAS that adapts to patients' movements may be more effective than rigid, fixed-tempo RAS used in most studies. In addition to auditory cueing, immersive virtual reality technologies that utilize interactive computer-generated systems through wearable devices are increasingly used for improving brain-body interaction and sensory-motor integration. Using multisensory cues, these therapies may be particularly suitable for the treatment of parkinsonian freezing and other gait disorders. In this review, we examine the affected neurological circuits underlying gait and temporal processing in PD patients and summarize the current studies demonstrating the effects of RAS on improving these gait deficits. © 2015 Ashoori, Eagleman and Jankovic.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Houston, S.

Feeling lovely: An examination of the value of beauty for people dancing with Parkinson's

(2015) Dance Research Journal, 47 (1), pp. 27-43.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84929938389&doi=10.1017%2fS0149767715000042&partnerID=40&md5=d1bca3aa0f38a577c8fb7753c20858ba

 

DOI: 10.1017/S0149767715000042

ABSTRACT: Against the backdrop of a four-year study into dance for people with Parkinson's, I examine one woman's claim that dancing makes her feel beautiful, and, as such, is fundamental to her well-being. I debate the challenge that this claim poses to those who argue that beauty in dance is at best unimportant, at worst disenfranchising. In debating this challenge, I create a link between aesthetics and health through a reformulation of the value of beauty in the context of chronic illness and well-being. This link then allows me to discuss how feeling lovely could become relevant and meaningful within the context of participating in dance. Copyright © 2015 Congress on Research in Dance.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Blandy, L.M., Beevers, W.A., Fitzmaurice, K., Morris, M.E.

Therapeutic Argentine tango dancing for people with mild Parkinson's disease: A feasibility study

(2015) Frontiers in Neurology, 6 (MAY), art. no. 00122, . Cited 4 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84930633975&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2015.00122&partnerID=40&md5=3b49edb8d499ea0f8c4efaf48e868240

 

DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2015.00122

ABSTRACT: Background: Individuals living with Parkinson's disease (PD) can experience a range of movement disorders that affect mobility and balance and increase the risk of falls. Low health-related quality of life, depression, and anxiety are more common in people with PD than age-matched comparisons. Therapeutic dance is a form of physical activity believed to facilitate movement and therapy uptake. As well as being enjoyable, dancing is thought to improve mobility, balance, and well-being in some people living with PD. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a 4-week Argentine tango dance program for people with PD. Methods: Six community dwelling individuals with mild to moderate PD were recruited from Parkinson's support groups, movement disorder clinics, and the PD association in Australia. To minimize falls risk, participants were required to be <75 years of age and physically independent (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-III). They were also required to speak English. Participants attended a 1-hour dance class at a dance studio twice per week for 4 weeks. A professional dance instructor led and choreographed the Argentine tango dance classes. Physiotherapists were present to assist participants during the class and served as dance partners as necessary. The primary outcome was feasibility, which was determined by measures of recruitment, adherence, attrition, safety (falls, near misses and adverse events), and resource requirements. Secondary measures included the Beck Depression Inventory and the Euroqol-5D, administered at baseline and post intervention. Therapy outcomes pre- and post-intervention were analyzed descriptively as medians and interquartile ranges and using Wilcoxon matched pair signed-rank tests. Results: The Argentine tango dance intervention was shown to be safe, with no adverse events. Adherence to the dance program was 89%. Depression scores improved after intervention (p = 0.04). Some challenges were associated with the need to quickly recruit participants and physiotherapists to act as dance partners during classes and to monitor participants. Conclusion: The 4-week, twice weekly Argentine tango dancing program was shown to be feasible and safe for people with mild-to-moderately severe PD. © 2015 Blandy, Beevers, Fitzmaurice and Morris.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Schiavio, A., Altenmüller, E.

Exploring music-based rehabilitation for Parkinsonism through embodied cognitive science

(2015) Frontiers in Neurology, 6 (OCT), art. no. 217, . Cited 4 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84946555659&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2015.00217&partnerID=40&md5=27f7232642b42d2de0fe88c270e1ebe5

 

DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2015.00217

ABSTRACT: Recent embodied approaches in cognitive sciences emphasize the constitutive roles of bodies and environment in driving cognitive processes. Cognition is thus seen as a distributed system based on the continuous interaction of bodies, brains, and environment. These categories, moreover, do not relate only causally, through a sequential input-output network of computations; rather, they are dynamically enfolded in each other, being mutually implemented by the concrete patterns of actions adopted by the cognitive system. However, while this claim has been widely discussed across various disciplines, its relevance and potential beneficial applications for music therapy remain largely unexplored. With this in mind, we provide here an overview of the embodied approaches to cognition, discussing their main tenets through the lenses of music therapy. In doing so, we question established methodological and theoretical paradigms and identify possible novel strategies for intervention. In particular, we refer to the music-based rehabilitative protocols adopted for Parkinson's disease patients. Indeed, in this context, it has recently been observed that music therapy not only affects movement-related skills but that it also contributes to stabilizing physiological functions and improving socio-affective behaviors. We argue that these phenomena involve previously unconsidered aspects of cognition and (motor) behavior, which are rooted in the action-perception cycle characterizing the whole living system. © 2015 Schiavio and Altenmüller.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Mirabella, G.

Is Art Therapy a Reliable Tool for Rehabilitating People Suffering from Brain/Mental Diseases?

(2015) Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 21 (4), pp. 196-199.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84934296126&doi=10.1089%2facm.2014.0374&partnerID=40&md5=24b2fd2f40c1f9f7a4e547cf47ba46a1

 

DOI: 10.1089/acm.2014.0374

ABSTRACT: Whether art therapy can be an effective rehabilitative treatment for people with brain or mental diseases (e.g., dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, autism, schizophrenia) is a long-standing and highly debated issue. On the one hand, several observational studies and anecdotal evidence enthusiastically support the effectiveness of arts-based therapy. On the other hand, few rigorous clinical investigations have been performed, and there is too little empirical evidence to allow a full assessment of the risks and benefits of this intervention. Nevertheless, there is a progressively increasing demand for the development of appropriate complementary therapies to improve the personal and social lives of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. This is because conventional medical treatments are aimed at alleviating symptoms but cannot arrest or reverse the degenerative process. Thus, as disease progresses and adverse effects emerge, patients' quality of life dramatically decreases; when this occurs patients seek different forms of intervention. Art therapy is a potentially appealing treatment because of its more holistic approach to healthcare. However, as with any medicine, its effects must be tested by using standard, rigorous scientific approaches. This report describes the current state of research into art therapy and outlines many key factors that future research should consider, all of which are directly or indirectly related to the neural mechanism underlying behavioral changes: brain plasticity. Artistic performance could promote some form of brain plasticity that, to some extent, might compensate for the brain damage caused by the disease. © 2015, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Šumec, R., Filip, P., Sheardová, K., Bareš, M.

Psychological Benefits of Nonpharmacological Methods Aimed for Improving Balance in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review

(2015) Behavioural Neurology, 2015, art. no. 620674, . Cited 8 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84937786477&doi=10.1155%2f2015%2f620674&partnerID=40&md5=d000ac41c717b11b79bcdb536b7e4e86

 

DOI: 10.1155/2015/620674

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a serious condition with a major negative impact on patient's physical and mental health. Postural instability is one of the cardinal difficulties reported by patients to deal with. Neuroanatomical, animal, and clinical studies on nonparkinsonian and parkinsonian subjects suggest an important correlation between the presence of balance dysfunction and multiple mood disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and apathy. Considering that balance dysfunction is a very common symptom in PD, we can presume that by its management we could positively influence patient's state of mind too. This review is an analysis of nonpharmacological methods shown to be effective and successful for improving balance in patients suffering from PD. Strategies such as general exercise, robotic assisted training, Tai Chi, Qi Gong, Yoga, dance (such as tango or ballet), box, virtual reality-based, or neurofeedback-based techniques and so forth can significantly improve the stability in these patients. Beside this physical outcome, many methods have also shown effect on quality of life, depression level, enjoyment, and motivation to continue in practicing the method independently. The purpose of this review is to provide information about practical and creative methods designed to improve balance in PD and highlight their positive impact on patient's psychology. © 2015 Rastislav Šumec et al.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Küther, G.

New physiotherapy interventions in parkinsons disease - What is the evidence? [Neue physiotherapeutische Behandlungsmethoden beim Morbus Parkinson - was ist gesichert?]

(2015) Physikalische Medizin Rehabilitationsmedizin Kurortmedizin, 25 (1), pp. 11-18. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84923371843&doi=10.1055%2fs-0034-1395653&partnerID=40&md5=15fd458afe26911e95b4fc5ae4b553f4

 

DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1395653

ABSTRACT: Introduction: In the last decade, an increasing number of randomized-controlled trials dealing with innovative new physiotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of Parkinsons disease have been published. Recent meta-analyses reflect this development by providing a much broader basis to evaluate their clinical effects. However, some discrepancies exist between these reports when regarding the selection of clinical trials and the estimation of therapeutic effects. The purpose of this review is to present an updated compilation of available evidence for beneficial effects of the different therapies and their clinical application. Methods: An electronic search was performed in the databases Medline, PubMed, and Google Scholar for meta-analyses, published between January 2000 and March 2014. Results: 8 meta-analyses could be identified. Level Ia evidence can be found for the efficacy of exercise, dance and cueing therapy. Also treadmill training reached level Ia evidence, although there are some discrepancies between 2 meta-analyses with different criteria for study selection. Tai Chi/Qigong and LSTV-BIG therapy reached Ib level, positive effects of a repetitive training of compensatory steps could be demonstrated on IIb level. No long lasting effect could be ascertained for whole-body vibration therapy. Positive effects of conventional physiotherapy on flexibility, and motor- and ADL functions are reported in only 3 studies. Effects sizes were always low to moderate, reaching up to 0.56. Almost all patients tested were in less advanced stages of their disease (i.e., Hoehn Yahr 2-3). General problems for an evaluation are a variable content, intensity and duration of tested treatments, as well as control groups with and without any therapy. Conclusion: The new physiotherapeutic concepts offer a promising new approach for treating symptoms of Parkinsons disease. Best effects can be expected in the treatment of bradykinesia and postural instability, so that the tested methods can be considered as a complementary approach to treat symptoms not sufficiently ameliorated by drug therapy or surgical intervention. Considering all published studies, a best practice concept is not yet available. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Lee, H.L., Battisto, J., Crosson, B., McGregor, K.M.

Context-dependent neural activation: Internally and externally guided rhythmic lower limb movement in individuals with and without neurodegenerative disease

(2015) Frontiers in Neurology, 6 (DEC), art. no. 00251, . Cited 2 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84954540806&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2015.00251&partnerID=40&md5=26e3e2399d846978877c42fa692b5f6d

 

DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2015.00251

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that has received considerable attention in allopathic medicine over the past decades. However, it is clear that, to date, pharmacological and surgical interventions do not fully address symptoms of PD and patients' quality of life. As both an alternative therapy and as an adjuvant to conventional approaches, several types of rhythmic movement (e.g., movement strategies, dance, tandem biking, and Tai Chi) have shown improvements to motor symptoms, lower limb control, and postural stability in people with PD (1-6). However, while these programs are increasing in number, still little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying motor improvements attained with such interventions. Studying limb motor control under task-specific contexts can help determine the mechanisms of rehabilitation effectiveness. Both internally guided (IG) and externally guided (EG) movement strategies have evidence to support their use in rehabilitative programs. However, there appears to be a degree of differentiation in the neural substrates involved in IG vs. EG designs. Because of the potential task-specific benefits of rhythmic training within a rehabilitative context, this report will consider the use of IG and EG movement strategies, and observations produced by functional magnetic resonance imaging and other imaging techniques. This review will present findings from lower limb imaging studies, under IG and EG conditions for populations with and without movement disorders. We will discuss how these studies might inform movement disorders rehabilitation (in the form of rhythmic, music-based movement training) and highlight research gaps. We believe better understanding of lower limb neural activity with respect to PD impairment during rhythmic IG and EG movement will facilitate the development of novel and effective therapeutic approaches to mobility limitations and postural instability. © 2015 Hackney, Lee, Battisto, Crosson and McGregor.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Hackney, M., McKee, K.

Community-based adapted tango dancing for individuals with Parkinson's disease and older adults

(2014) Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE, (94), .

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85017330648&doi=10.3791%2f52066&partnerID=40&md5=9d7943a10665e67c9ebe0ba1256d8fd0

 

DOI: 10.3791/52066

ABSTRACT: Adapted tango dancing improves mobility and balance in older adults and additional populations with balance impairments. It is composed of very simple step elements. Adapted tango involves movement initiation and cessation, multi-directional perturbations, varied speeds and rhythms. Focus on foot placement, whole body coordination, and attention to partner, path of movement, and aesthetics likely underlie adapted tango's demonstrated efficacy for improving mobility and balance. In this paper, we describe the methodology to disseminate the adapted tango teaching methods to dance instructor trainees and to implement the adapted tango by the trainees in the community for older adults and individuals with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Efficacy in improving mobility (measured with the Timed Up and Go, Tandem stance, Berg Balance Scale, Gait Speed and 30 sec chair stand), safety and fidelity of the program is maximized through targeted instructor and volunteer training and a structured detailed syllabus outlining class practices and progression.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M., McKee, K.

Community-based adapted tango dancing for individuals with Parkinson’s disease and older adults

(2014) Journal of Visualized Experiments, (94), . Cited 3 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84917691513&doi=10.3791%2f52066&partnerID=40&md5=f4d3dfb8d0f1e1a97c1f15aba7aff024

 

DOI: 10.3791/52066

ABSTRACT: Adapted tango dancing improves mobility and balance in older adults and additional populations with balance impairments. It is composed of very simple step elements. Adapted tango involves movement initiation and cessation, multi-directional perturbations, varied speeds and rhythms. Focus on foot placement, whole body coordination, and attention to partner, path of movement, and aesthetics likely underlie adapted tango’s demonstrated efficacy for improving mobility and balance. In this paper, we describe the methodology to disseminate the adapted tango teaching methods to dance instructor trainees and to implement the adapted tango by the trainees in the community for older adults and individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Efficacy in improving mobility (measured with the Timed Up and Go, Tandem stance, Berg Balance Scale, Gait Speed and 30 sec chair stand), safety and fidelity of the program is maximized through targeted instructor and volunteer training and a structured detailed syllabus outlining class practices and progression. © JoVE 2006-2014. All Rights Reserved.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Sharp, K., Hewitt, J.

Dance as an intervention for people with Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

(2014) Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 47, pp. 445-456. Cited 19 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84918812259&doi=10.1016%2fj.neubiorev.2014.09.009&partnerID=40&md5=40b69afe6cbd9ff4586c7f3cc400ef2f

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2014.09.009

ABSTRACT: Recent studies suggest dance may be able to improve motor and non-motor disabilities in Parkinson's disease patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCT's) regarding the effectiveness of dance compared with no intervention and other exercise interventions was performed. Five trials were included and methodological quality and mean or standardised mean differences were calculated. Dance significantly improved UPDRS motor scores (-10.73, CI -15.05 to -6.16; P= 0.004), berg balance (0.72, CI 0.31 to 1.44; P= 0.0006) and gait speed (0.14. m/s CI 0.02 to 0.26; P= 0.02) when compared with no intervention. When compared with other exercise interventions significant improvements in berg balance (3.98, CI 1.52 to 6.44, P= 0.002) and quality of life (PDQ-39) (-4.00, CI -7.13 to -0.87, P= 0.01) were found. Dance demonstrates short term clinically meaningful benefits in Parkinson's disease. Future RCT's should be well designed and determine the long term effects of dance, which dose and type of dance is most effective and how dance compares to other exercise therapies. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Holm, R.P.

Moving to the sound of music

(2014) South Dakota medicine : the journal of the South Dakota State Medical Association, 67 (11), p. 476.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84922275307&partnerID=40&md5=9c750b975414c9815c3e593575a86e54

 

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Kaski, D., Allum, J.H., Bronstein, A.M., Dominguez, R.O.

Applying anodal tDCS during tango dancing in a patient with Parkinson's disease

(2014) Neuroscience Letters, 568, pp. 39-43. Cited 10 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84898869537&doi=10.1016%2fj.neulet.2014.03.043&partnerID=40&md5=48aa42c69aa52663e2eb2f93ebd3751b

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2014.03.043

ABSTRACT: Gait disturbance in patients with Parkinson's disease remains a therapeutic challenge, given its poor response to levodopa. Dance therapy is of recognised benefit in these patients, particularly partnered dance forms such as the tango. In parallel, non-invasive brain stimulation has begun to show promise for the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's disease, although effects on gait, compared to upper limbs, have been less well defined. We applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in a 79 year old male patient with moderate Parkinson's disease during tango dancing to assess its effect on trunk motion and balance. The patient performed a total of four dances over two days, two 'tango. +. tDCS' and two 'tango. +. sham' in a randomised double-blind fashion. In a separate experimental session we also assessed the isolated effect of tDCS (and sham) on gait without tango dancing. For the dance session, trunk peak velocity during tango was significantly greater during tDCS compared to sham stimulation. In the gait experiments we observed a modest but significant reduction in the time taken to complete the 3. m 'timed up and go' and 6. m walk, and an increase in overall gait velocity and peak pitch trunk velocity with tDCS compared to sham. Our findings suggest that tDCS may be a useful adjunct to gait rehabilitation for patients with PD, although studies in a larger group of patients are needed to evaluate the therapeutic use of non-invasive brain stimulation during dance therapy. © 2014.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Barry, G., Galna, B., Rochester, L.

The role of exergaming in Parkinson's disease rehabilitation: A systematic review of the evidence

(2014) Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 11 (1), art. no. 33, . Cited 45 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84899535402&doi=10.1186%2f1743-0003-11-33&partnerID=40&md5=e2e6003e02419f638ec6b3dd00c0df06

 

DOI: 10.1186/1743-0003-11-33

ABSTRACT: Evidence for exercise based computer games (exergaming) as a rehabilitation tool for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) is only now emerging and is yet to be synthesised. To this end, we conducted a systematic review of the exergaming literature to establish what is known about the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of exergaming for rehabilitation of motor symptoms experienced by people with PD. Seven electronic databases were searched for key terms surrounding exergaming and PD. Data were extracted by two reviewers independently. From an initial yield of 1217 articles, seven were included in the review. Six studies used commercial games with the Nintendo Wii fit platform. The scientific quality of reporting was generally good, however the overall methodological design of studies was weak, with only one randomised controlled trial being reported. Safety: Participant safety was not measured in any of the studies. Feasibility: People with PD were able to play exergames, improve their performance of gameplay and enjoyed playing. However, one study observed that people with PD had difficulty with fast and complex games. Effectiveness: Six studies showed that exergaming elicited improvements in a range of clinical balance measures or reduction in the severity of motor symptoms. Results from the only randomised controlled trial showed that exergaming was as effective as traditional balance training for people with PD to improve the UPDRS II, standing balance and cognition, with improvements in both groups retained 60 days after the training ended. In conclusion, exergaming is an emerging tool to help rehabilitate motor skills in people with PD. Although we were able to establish that exergaming is feasible in people with PD, more research is needed to establish its safety and clinical effectiveness, particularly in the home. The use of commercial games may be too difficult for some people with PD and exergames tailored specifically to the rehabilitation needs and capabilities of people with PD are required for optimal efficacy, adherence and safety. © 2014 Barry et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Murray, D.K., Sacheli, M.A., Eng, J.J., Stoessl, A.J.

The effects of exercise on cognition in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review

(2014) Translational Neurodegeneration, 3 (1), art. no. 5, . Cited 25 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84896695614&doi=10.1186%2f2047-9158-3-5&partnerID=40&md5=96e19bb569e2531cbd0ad621e0ef3aba

 

DOI: 10.1186/2047-9158-3-5

ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairments are highly prevalent in Parkinson's disease (PD) and can substantially affect a patient's quality of life. These impairments remain difficult to manage with current clinical therapies, but exercise has been identified as a possible treatment. The objective of this systematic review was to accumulate and analyze evidence for the effects of exercise on cognition in both animal models of PD and human disease. This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Fourteen original reports were identified, including six pre-clinical animal studies and eight human clinical studies. These studies used various exercise interventions and evaluated many different outcome measures; therefore, only a qualitative synthesis was performed. The evidence from animal studies supports the role of exercise to improve cognition in humans through the promotion of neuronal proliferation, neuroprotection and neurogenesis. These findings warrant more research to determine what roles these neural mechanisms play in clinical populations. The reports on cognitive changes in clinical studies demonstrate that a range of exercise programs can improve cognition in humans. While each clinical study demonstrated improvements in a marker of cognition, there were limitations in each study, including non-randomized designs and risk of bias. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used and the quality of the evidence for human studies were rated from " low" to " moderate" and the strength of the recommendations were rated from " weak" to " strong" . Studies that assessed executive function, compared to general cognitive abilities, received a higher GRADE rating. Overall, this systematic review found that in animal models exercise results in behavioral and corresponding neurobiological changes in the basal ganglia related to cognition. The clinical studies showed that various types of exercise, including aerobic, resistance and dance can improve cognitive function, although the optimal type, amount, mechanisms, and duration of exercise are unclear. With growing support for exercise to improve not only motor symptoms, but also cognitive impairments in PD, health care providers and policy makers should recommend exercise as part of routine management and neurorehabilitation for this disorder. © 2014 Murray et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

McGill, A., Houston, S., Lee, R.Y.W.

Dance for Parkinson's: A new framework for research on its physical, mental, emotional, and social benefits

(2014) Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 22 (3), pp. 426-432. Cited 4 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84901917845&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2014.03.005&partnerID=40&md5=397a34771de80178121af6da2a3345fd

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2014.03.005

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's is a neurodegenerative disease commonly associated with symptoms such as tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, freezing during gait, motor control deficits and instability. These physical symptoms can cause a myriad of psychological problems including depression, feelings of loneliness, and low self-esteem. Current research suggests pharmacological interventions do not sufficiently address all symptoms and thus alternative therapies have been deemed an important part of treatment for people with Parkinson's. Dance has shown to be a beneficial activity for this population. Upon reviewing recent dance for Parkinson's studies it is clear that there are developing trends with respect to overall approach. The tendency to place more emphasis on changes to clinical signs is creating a gap whereby research neglects to look at how dance is influencing a particular individual in all aspects of their life. There is a need for a framework that allows for and encourages the analysis of the dancing experience for people with Parkinson's on a variety of levels including physically, mentally, emotionally, and socially. With such a framework it would be possible to triangulate the information gathered to draw stronger conclusions that are more meaningful to the people with Parkinson's. This paper would like to propose the use of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health as a possible framework for dance for Parkinson's research. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Duncan, R.P., Earhart, G.M.

Are the effects of community-based dance on Parkinson disease severity, balance, and functional mobility reduced with time? A 2-year prospective pilot study

(2014) Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 20 (10), pp. 757-763. Cited 20 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84912102885&doi=10.1089%2facm.2012.0774&partnerID=40&md5=16c84d198d8a03989539a911abca62e3

 

DOI: 10.1089/acm.2012.0774

ABSTRACT: Objective: To determine the effects of participation in a 2-year community-based dance class on disease severity and functional mobility in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Design: Randomized controlled trial. Settings/Location: Dance classes took place in a community-based location. Outcome measures were collected in a university laboratory. Patients: Ten individuals with PD were randomly assigned to the Argentine tango (AT) group (n = 5 [4 men]; mean age ± standard deviation, 69.6 ± 6.6 years) or the control group (n = 5 [4 men]; mean age ± standard deviation, 66 ± 11.0 years). Interventions: The AT group participated in a community-based AT class for 1 hour twice weekly for 2 years. Control group participants were given no prescribed exercise. Blinded assessments occurred at baseline and 12 and 24 months. Outcome measures: Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) III, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest), gait velocity (forward and backward), Timed Up and Go and dual-task Timed Up and Go, Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), MDS-UPDRS II, MDS-UPDRS I, and Freezing of Gait Questionnaire. Results: There were no differences between groups at baseline. A significant group-by-time interaction (F [2,8] = 17.59; p < 0.0001) was noted for the MDS-UPDRS III, with the AT group having lower scores at 12 and 24 months than the controls. Significant interactions were also noted for the Mini-BESTest, MDS-UPDRS II and I, and 6MWT. Conclusion: This is believed to be one of the longest-duration studies to examine the effects of exercise on PD. Participation in community-based dance classes over 2 years was associated with improvements in motor and nonmotor symptom severity, performance on activities of daily living, and balance in a small group of people with PD. This is noteworthy given the progressive nature of PD and the fact that the control group declined on some outcome measures over 2 years. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Lewis, C., Annett, L.E., Davenport, S., Hall, A.A., Lovatt, P.

Mood changes following social dance sessions in people with Parkinson's disease

(2014) Journal of Health Psychology, 21 (4), pp. 483-492. Cited 4 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84963567960&doi=10.1177%2f1359105314529681&partnerID=40&md5=7d4750e19ec65f17cbabbb124c1e2300

 

DOI: 10.1177/1359105314529681

ABSTRACT: Dance interventions have physical benefits for the elderly, especially those with Parkinson's disease. This study assessed the psychological benefits of dance. A total of 37 participants, with either Parkinson's disease (n = 22) or age-matched controls (n = 15) completed mood questionnaires before and after a 10-week dance intervention. An overall reduction in total mood disturbance and a specific reduction in anger were observed. In addition, less fatigue was found for those initially scoring higher in depression. This suggests that dance can provide psychological benefits for both people with Parkinson's disease and the elderly, with findings suggesting that this is an avenue to be explored further. © SAGE Publications.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Batson, G., Migliarese, S.J., Soriano, C., H. Burdette, J., Laurienti, P.J.

Effects of improvisational dance on balance in Parkinson's disease: A two-phase fMRI case study

(2014) Physical and Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics, 32 (3), pp. 188-197. Cited 3 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84905978123&doi=10.3109%2f02703181.2014.927946&partnerID=40&md5=0605cbf7ba7d3e0eaf1b9bb9e96a4a2b

 

DOI: 10.3109/02703181.2014.927946

ABSTRACT: Aims: This two-phase pilot examined the effects of group-delivered improvisational dance on balance in people with Parkinson's disease. Subsequently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was examined in one individual for changes in whole-brain functional network connectivity. Methods: In Phase I, seven community-dwelling adults (mean age 67) with middle stage Parkinson's disease completed a 7-week improvisation dance series. In Phase II, one participant from the pilot group underwent brain scanning following a 5-day trial of dance. Results: Group pretest-posttest balance comparisons from Phase I were significant on the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (p = 0.017). Posttest scans in Phase II exhibited significantly increased network connectivity between the basal ganglia and premotor cortices. Conclusions: Improvisational dance resulted in functional gains in balance for people with Parkinson's disease and merits further exploration. For one participant, functional improvements appeared to correlate with emergence of higher order neural functioning. © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Mandelbaum, R., Lo, A.C.

Examining Dance as an Intervention in Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review

(2014) American Journal of Dance Therapy, 36 (2), pp. 160-175. Cited 4 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84944866158&doi=10.1007%2fs10465-014-9181-6&partnerID=40&md5=2ab66ef6f28e10948a3c6b26ba576cc7

 

DOI: 10.1007/s10465-014-9181-6

ABSTRACT: Recently, dance has become a therapeutic and rehabilitative intervention for individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Compared with traditional gait training or other rehabilitative interventions, dance appears to be a safe, fun, and an alternative way to achieve functional changes and improvements in mobility, gait, balance, and quality of life. This paper reviews literature regarding dance and PD in terms of enrollment size, dosage and frequency of intervention, class size, comparison or control groups, outcome measures, and effect size. A search was conducted on PubMed, Web of Sciences, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar using the terms “dance” and “Parkinson’s disease.” Ten papers were included in this review: seven of which examined walking speed, nine that included measures of balance, one study that examined upper extremity function, eight studies that measured disability rating, and one study that examined falls. Only five studies had control groups, three of which were active control groups. Various studies have clinical design issues such as inclusion of a control group, outcome measures or the way in which the intervention was administered. Essential outcome measures to include are safety, tolerability, quality of life, and falls. These measures determine information on treatment effects, adverse event rates, and dropout rates. © 2014, American Dance Therapy Association (outside the USA).

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Bega, D., Gonzalez-Latapi, P., Zadikoff, C., Simuni, T.

A Review of the Clinical Evidence for Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Parkinson’s Disease

(2014) Current Treatment Options in Neurology, 16 (10), 19 p. Cited 11 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84919927989&doi=10.1007%2fs11940-014-0314-5&partnerID=40&md5=8bcf196bba94d615b18f6b3cf1da37aa

 

DOI: 10.1007/s11940-014-0314-5

ABSTRACT: No conventional treatment has been convincingly demonstrated to slow or stop the progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Dopaminergic therapy is the gold standard for managing the motor disability associated with PD, but it falls short of managing all of the aspects of the disease that contribute to quality of life. Perhaps for this reason, an increasing number of patients are searching for a more holistic approach to healthcare. This is not to say that they are abandoning the standard and effective symptomatic therapies for PD, but rather are complementing them with healthy living, mind-body practices, and natural products that empower patients to be active participants in their healthcare and widen the net under which disease modification might one day be achieved. Despite high rates of utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices, data on efficacy is generally limited, restricting physicians in providing guidance to interested patients. Exercise is now well-established as integral in the management of PD, but mind-body interventions such as Tai Chi that incorporate relaxation and mindfulness with physical activity should be routinely encouraged as well. While no comment can be made about neuroplastic or disease-modifying effects of mind-body interventions, patients should be encouraged to be as active as possible and engage with others in enjoyable and challenging activities such as dance, music therapy, and yoga. Many PD patients also choose to try herbs, vitamins, and neutraceuticals as part of a healthy lifestyle, with the added expectation that these products may lower free radical damage and protect them against further cell death. Evidence for neuroprotection is limited, but patients can be encouraged to maintain a healthy diet rich in “high-power,” low-inflammatory foods, while at the same time receiving education that many promising natural products have produced disappointing results in clinical trials. It is vital that the science of holistic medicine reaches a point where all neutraceuticals are investigated with the same rigor as conventional drugs. A number of agents discussed here that have a proposed role in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases (and PD in particular), including cannabis, mucuna pruriens, and Chinese herbals, deserve more attention from basic science researchers and clinical investigators before they can be either safely utilized or dismissed. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Pethybridge, R.

Relative proximity: Reaching towards an ethics of touch in cross-generational dance practice

(2014) Journal of Dance and Somatic Practices, 6 (2), pp. 175-187. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84928679944&doi=10.1386%2fjdsp.6.2.175_1&partnerID=40&md5=b4d0e034f9c4876ff31e4e5cbc959d1a

 

DOI: 10.1386/jdsp.6.2.175_1

ABSTRACT: This article addresses the potential for an embodied ethics of touch in the context of cross-generational dance work, in particular through the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. Focusing on choreographic processes and performances involving parents and children I examine the relationships that are reoriented through the shifting mode of being that is dancing together. This is in part an auto-ethnographic enquiry as I reflect on my own experiences as a new mother dancing with my daughter in Baby Jam1 and relating to her in life. Proximity is used as a way to frame the autoethnographic lens and to discuss ethics as a way of relating. This article suggests an ambiguous definition of ‘contact’: conceiving of it as a mode of communication as well as a dance practice The article questions how contact might be defined without the use of touch, by including the potential of touch as well as its actualization. Using Manning’s 2009 notion of relational movement, I refer to the ‘about-to-be’ moment in contact and the ethical relationships that this engenders. This article references three case studies as examples: my own cross-generational duet project with an adult mother and daughter, my experiences as a new mother and the work of Giulio D’Anna and his recent piece choreographed with his father Parkin’son. It discusses the ontological implications of contact across generations as a way of being together, reaching towards an ethics of touch rather than fixing its meaning. © 2014 Intellect Ltd Article.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Ashburn, A., Roberts, L., Pickering, R., Roberts, H.C., Wiles, R., Kunkel, D., Hulbert, S., Robison, J., Fitton, C.

A design to investigate the feasibility and effects of partnered ballroom dancing on people with parkinson disease: Randomized controlled trial protocol

(2014) Journal of Medical Internet Research, 16 (7), . Cited 3 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84906259457&doi=10.2196%2fresprot.3184&partnerID=40&md5=8f1f70c3d83e6381b4004ba3bc8c7be0

 

DOI: 10.2196/resprot.3184

ABSTRACT: Self-help and physical leisure activities has become increasingly important in the maintenance of safe and functional mobility among an increasingly elderly population. Preventing the cycle of deterioration, falling, inactivity, dependency, and secondary complications in people with Parkinson disease (PD) is a priority. Research has shown that people with PD are interested in dance and although the few existing trials are small, initial proof of principle trials from the United States have demonstrated beneficial effects on balance control, gait, and activity levels. To our knowledge, there has been no research into long-term effects, cost effectiveness, the influence on spinal posture and turning, or the personal insights of dance participants. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the methodological feasibility of conducting a definitive phase III trial to evaluate the benefits of dance in people with PD. We will build on the proof of principle trials by addressing gaps in knowledge, focusing on areas of greatest methodological uncertainty; the choice of dances and intensity of the program; for the main trial, the availability of partners, the suitability of the currently envisaged primary outcomes, balance and spinal posture; and the key costs of delivering and participating in a dance program to inform economic evaluation. Methods: Fifty participants (mild-to-moderate condition) will be randomized to the control (usual care) or experimental (dance plus usual care) groups at a ratio of 15:35. Dance will be taught by professional teachers in a dance center in the South of England. Each participant in the experimental group will dance with his or her spouse, a friend, or a partner from a bank of volunteers. A blinded assessor will complete clinical measures and self-reported ability at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months after randomization. A qualitative study of a subgroup of participants and partners will examine user's views about the appropriateness and acceptability of the intervention, assessment protocol, and general trial procedures. Procedures for an economic evaluation of dance for health care will be developed for the main trial. Results: Recruitment began in January 2013 and the last participant is expected to complete the trial follow-up in June 2014. Conclusions: Findings from our study may provide novel insights into the way people with PD become involved in dance, their views and opinions, and the suitability of our primary and secondary outcomes.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Tomlinson, C.L., Herd, C.P., Clarke, C.E., Meek, C., Patel, S., Stowe, R., Deane, K.H., Shah, L., Sackley, C.M., Wheatley, K., Ives, N.

Physiotherapy for Parkinson's disease: a comparison of techniques

(2014) The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 6, p. CD002815. Cited 27 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84920713789&doi=10.1002%2f14651858.CD002815.pub2&partnerID=40&md5=a939ac209eedca9f0d213ea530f027a0

 

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD002815.pub2

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite medical therapies and surgical interventions for Parkinson's disease (PD), patients develop progressive disability. The role of physiotherapy is to maximise functional ability and minimise secondary complications through movement rehabilitation within a context of education and support for the whole person. The overall aim is to optimise independence, safety and wellbeing, thereby enhancing quality of life. Trials have shown that physiotherapy has short-term benefits in PD. However, which physiotherapy intervention is most effective remains unclear.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of one physiotherapy intervention compared with a second approach in patients with PD.

SEARCH METHODS: Relevant trials were identified by electronic searches of numerous literature databases (for example MEDLINE, EMBASE) and trial registers, plus handsearching of major journals, abstract books, conference proceedings and reference lists of retrieved publications. The literature search included trials published up to the end of January 2012.

SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials of one physiotherapy intervention versus another physiotherapy intervention in patients with PD.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data were abstracted independently from each paper by two authors. Trials were classified into the following intervention comparisons: general physiotherapy, exercise, treadmill training, cueing, dance and martial arts.

MAIN RESULTS: A total of 43 trials were identified with 1673 participants. All trials used small patient numbers (average trial size of 39 participants); the methods of randomisation and concealment of allocation were poor or not stated in most trials. Blinded assessors were used in just over half of the trials and only 10 stated that they used intention-to-treat analysis.A wide variety of validated and customised outcome measures were used to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions. The most frequently reported physiotherapy outcomes were gait speed and timed up and go, in 19 and 15 trials respectively. Only five of the 43 trials reported data on falls (12%). The motor subscales of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 were the most commonly reported clinician-rated disability and patient-rated quality of life outcome measures, used in 22 and 13 trials respectively. The content and delivery of the physiotherapy interventions varied widely in the trials included within this review, so no quantitative meta-analysis could be performed.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Considering the small number of participants examined, the methodological flaws in many of the studies, the possibility of publication bias, and the variety of interventions, formal comparison of the different physiotherapy techniques could not be performed. There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of one physiotherapy intervention over another in PD.This review shows that a wide range of physiotherapy interventions to treat PD have been tested . There is a need for more specific trials with improved treatment strategies to underpin the most appropriate choice of physiotherapy intervention and the outcomes measured.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Tomlinson, C.L., Herd, C.P., Clarke, C.E., Meek, C., Patel, S., Stowe, R., Deane, K.H.O., Shah, L., Sackley, C.M., Wheatley, K., Ives, N.

Physiotherapy for parkinson's disease: A comparison of techniques

(2014) Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2014 (6), pp. 1-119. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85013046448&doi=10.1002%2f14651858.CD002815.pub2&partnerID=40&md5=5a08376338dc2d2b15d12fb9bca5fe14

 

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD002815.pub2

ABSTRACT: Background Despite medical therapies and surgical interventions for Parkinson's disease (PD), patients develop progressive disability. The role of physiotherapy is tomaximise functional ability andminimise secondary complications throughmovement rehabilitationwithin a context of education and support for the whole person. The overall aim is to optimise independence, safety and wellbeing, thereby enhancing quality of life. Trials have shown that physiotherapy has short-term benefits in PD. However, which physiotherapy intervention is most effective remains unclear. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of one physiotherapy intervention compared with a second approach in patients with PD. Search methods Relevant trials were identified by electronic searches of numerous literature databases (for example MEDLINE, EMBASE) and trial registers, plus handsearching of major journals, abstract books, conference proceedings and reference lists of retrieved publications. The literature search included trials published up to the end of January 2012. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of one physiotherapy intervention versus another physiotherapy intervention in patients with PD. Data collection and analysis Data were abstracted independently from each paper by two authors. Trials were classified into the following intervention comparisons: general physiotherapy, exercise, treadmill training, cueing, dance and martial arts. Main results A total of 43 trials were identified with 1673 participants. All trials used small patient numbers (average trial size of 39 participants); the methods of randomisation and concealment of allocation were poor or not stated in most trials. Blinded assessors were used in just over half of the trials and only 10 stated that they used intention-to-treat analysis. A wide variety of validated and customised outcome measures were used to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions. The most frequently reported physiotherapy outcomes were gait speed and timed up and go, in 19 and 15 trials respectively. Only five of the 43 trials reported data on falls (12%). The motor subscales of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 were the most commonly reported clinician-rated disability and patient-rated quality of life outcome measures, used in 22 and 13 trials respectively. The content and delivery of the physiotherapy interventions varied widely in the trials included within this review, so no quantitative meta-analysis could be performed. Authors' conclusions Considering the small number of participants examined, the methodological flaws in many of the studies, the possibility of publication bias, and the variety of interventions, formal comparison of the different physiotherapy techniques could not be performed. There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of one physiotherapy intervention over another in PD. This review shows that a wide range of physiotherapy interventions to treat PD have been tested . There is a need for more specific trials with improved treatment strategies to underpin the most appropriate choice of physiotherapy intervention and the outcomes measured. © 2014 The Cochrane Collaboration.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Tomlinson, C.L., Patel, S., Meek, C., Herd, C.P., Clarke, C.E., Stowe, R., Shah, L., Sackley, C.M., Deane, K.H., Wheatley, K., Ives, N.

Physiotherapy versus placebo or no intervention in Parkinson's disease.

(2013) The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 9, pp. CD002817. Cited 57 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84898735595&partnerID=40&md5=9704323fbecd257db3378e3d47012b54

 

ABSTRACT: Despite medical therapies and surgical interventions for Parkinson's disease (PD), patients develop progressive disability. Physiotherapy aims to maximise functional ability and minimise secondary complications through movement rehabilitation within a context of education and support for the whole person. The overall aim is to optimise independence, safety, and well-being, thereby enhancing quality of life. To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy intervention compared with no intervention in patients with PD. We identified relevant trials by conducting electronic searches of numerous literature databases (e.g. MEDLINE, EMBASE) and trial registers, and by handsearching major journals, abstract books, conference proceedings, and reference lists of retrieved publications. The literature search included trials published up to the end of January 2012. Randomised controlled trials of physiotherapy intervention versus no physiotherapy intervention in patients with PD. Two review authors independently extracted data from each article. We used standard meta-analysis methods to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy intervention compared with no physiotherapy intervention. Trials were classified into the following intervention comparisons: general physiotherapy, exercise, treadmill training, cueing, dance, and martial arts. We used tests for heterogeneity to assess for differences in treatment effect across these different physiotherapy interventions. We identified 39 trials with 1827 participants. We considered the trials to be at a mixed risk of bias as the result of unreported allocation concealment and probable detection bias. Compared with no intervention, physiotherapy significantly improved the gait outcomes of speed (mean difference 0.04 m/s, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02 to 0.06, P = 0.0002); two- or six-minute walk test (13.37 m, 95% CI 0.55 to 26.20, P = 0.04) and Freezing of Gait questionnaire (-1.41, 95% CI -2.63 to -0.19, P = 0.02); functional mobility and balance outcomes of Timed Up & Go test (-0.63 s, 95% CI -1.05 to -0.21, P = 0.003), Functional Reach Test (2.16 cm, 95% CI 0.89 to 3.43, P = 0.0008), and Berg Balance Scale (3.71 points, 95% CI 2.30 to 5.11, P < 0.00001); and clinician-rated disability using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) (total -6.15 points, 95% CI-8.57 to -3.73, P < 0.00001; activities of daily living: -1.36, 95% CI -2.41 to -0.30, P = 0.01; and motor: -5.01, 95% CI -6.30 to -3.72, P < 0.00001). No difference between arms was noted in falls (Falls Efficacy Scale: -1.91 points, 95% CI -4.76 to 0.94, P = 0.19) or patient-rated quality of life (PDQ-39 Summary Index: -0.38 points, 95% CI -2.58 to 1.81, P = 0.73). One study reported that adverse events were rare; no other studies reported data on this outcome. Indirect comparisons of the different physiotherapy interventions revealed no evidence that the treatment effect differed across physiotherapy interventions for any of the outcomes assessed. Benefit for physiotherapy was found in most outcomes over the short term (i.e. < 3 months) but was significant only for speed, two- or six-minute walk test, Freezing of Gait questionnaire, Timed Up & Go, Functional Reach Test, Berg Balance Scale, and clinician-rated UPDRS. Most of the observed differences between treatments were small. However, for some outcomes (e.g. speed, Berg Balance Scale, UPDRS), the differences observed were at, or approaching, what are considered minimal clinically important changes. These benefits should be interpreted with caution because the quality of most of the included trials was not high. Variation in measurements of outcome between studies meant that our analyses include a small proportion of the participants recruited.This review illustrates that a wide range of approaches are employed by physiotherapists to treat patients with PD. However, no evidence of differences in treatment effect was noted between the different types of physiotherapy interventions being used, although this was based on indirect comparisons. A consensus menu of 'best practice' physiotherapy is needed, as are large, well-designed randomised controlled trials undertaken to demonstrate the longer-term efficacy and cost-effectiveness of 'best practice' physiotherapy in PD.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

McKee, K.E., Hackney, M.E.

The effects of adapted tango on spatial cognition and disease severity in parkinson's disease

(2013) Journal of Motor Behavior, 45 (6), pp. 519-529. Cited 31 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84887825678&doi=10.1080%2f00222895.2013.834288&partnerID=40&md5=cee4fde9e17da349957b2a9fc64b9fc3

 

DOI: 10.1080/00222895.2013.834288

ABSTRACT: The authors determined effects of community-based adapted tango on spatial cognition and disease severity in Parkinson's disease (PD) while controlling for the effects of social interaction. Thirty-three individuals with mild-to-moderate PD (stage I-III) were assigned to twenty 90-min tango (n = 24) or education (n = 9) lessons over 12 weeks. Disease severity, spatial cognition, balance, and fall incidence were evaluated pre-, post-, and 10-12 weeks postintervention. The authors evaluated differences using t tests and analyses of variance. Twenty-three tango and 8 education participants finished. Tango participants improved on disease severity (p =.008), and spatial cognition (p =.021) compared with education participants. Tango participants also improved in balance (p =.038), and executive function (p =.012). Gains were maintained 10-12 weeks postintervention. Multimodal exercise with structured syllabi may improve disease severity and spatial cognition in PD. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Pánek, D., Tupá, V., Pavlů, D., Čemusová, J.

Using dance in Parkinson's patients treatment [Využití tance v rehabilitační léčbě pacientů s Parkinsonovou nemocí]

(2013) Rehabilitace a Fyzikalni Lekarstvi, 20 (1), pp. 28-34. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84883346824&partnerID=40&md5=9767a7261df2a10a51215f39aef0e76b

 

ABSTRACT: The review discusses the possible impact of dance therapy in patients suffering from the Parkinson's disease. From the many classical dances, the reviewed studies chose Argentinian tango which, according to the review's authors, has the most beneficial effects on the motoric behavior of Parkinson's patients. Reviewed results were split into four groups according to the type of research work: original experiment, review study, comparative study and non-controlled study. A positive impact of dance therapy is indicated by most studies which, subsequently, recommend this type of supportive rehabilitation therapy.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Young-Mason, J.

Revisiting the Mark Morris dance group dance for Parkinson's disease program

(2013) Clinical Nurse Specialist, 27 (5), pp. 275-276.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84883408389&doi=10.1097%2fNUR.0b013e3182a0bab5&partnerID=40&md5=0cb2db937bb1534428c09af9e8620099

 

DOI: 10.1097/NUR.0b013e3182a0bab5

DOCUMENT TYPE: Note

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Tuschkan, S., Wansorra, H.

Let's dance with Parkinson [Let's Dance mit Parkinson]

(2013) Ergotherapie und Rehabilitation, 52 (8), pp. 11-15.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84881290359&doi=10.2443%2fskv-s-2013-51020130801&partnerID=40&md5=26387f9abb160760e0c3acaec28f4eb3

 

DOI: 10.2443/skv-s-2013-51020130801

ABSTRACT: As a neurodegenerative disease Parkinson and its symptoms affect people's ability to perform activities of daily living and to participate in daily life. This leads to increased dependency, giving up personal, social and leisure activities and consequently reduced quality of life. A number of studies suggest that dance, because of its specific character such as rhythm and tune, positively influences motor and social parameters as well as aspects of quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease. Implementing an adapted dance class within occupational therapy services in a specialty hospital for Parkinson's disease resulted in positive experiences for all participants.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Natbony, L.R., Zimmer, A., Ivanco, L.S., Studenski, S.A., Jain, S.

Perceptions of a Videogame-Based Dance Exercise Program among Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

(2013) Games for Health Journal, 2 (4), pp. 235-239. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84992694497&doi=10.1089%2fg4h.2013.0011&partnerID=40&md5=d79f526c6049b69eca9ffe7530961c5e

 

DOI: 10.1089/g4h.2013.0011

ABSTRACT: Objective: Physical therapy, including exercise, improves gait and quality of life in Parkinson's disease (PD). Many programs promoting physical activity have generated significant short-term gains, but adherence has been a problem. A recent evidence-based analysis of clinical trials using physical therapy in PD patients produced four key treatment recommendations: cognitive movement strategies, physical capacity, balance training, and cueing. We have attempted to incorporate all four of these features together through a dance exercise program using the dance videogame "Dance Dance Revolution" (DDR) (Konami Digital Entertainment, El Segundo, CA). Subjects and Methods: Sixteen medically stable participants with mild to moderate PD were given the opportunity to try DDR with supervision by a research staff member. Feedback about the advantages and disadvantages of DDR as a form of physical activity was elicited through focus groups using the nominal group technique. Results: Of 21 advantages and 17 disadvantages elicited, the most frequently cited advantages were "fun" and "easy to use," followed by "improves balance or coordination," "challenging," and "full body aerobic activity." Common concerns were the distracting or confusing interface, cost, and possible technical issues. Discussion: Interactive dance exercise was appealing to participants with PD and may help promote adherence to physical activity. Concerns regarding familiarity with the technology may be addressed with simplification of the interface or additional training for participants. Results support a larger longitudinal study of DDR in PD. © Copyright 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2013.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Volpe, D., Signorini, M., Marchetto, A., Lynch, T., Morris, M.E.

A comparison of Irish set dancing and exercises for people with Parkinson's disease: A phase II feasibility study

(2013) BMC Geriatrics, 13 (1), art. no. 54, . Cited 29 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84878406899&doi=10.1186%2f1471-2318-13-54&partnerID=40&md5=0eec1e6e735076dc7a212d143c46836d

 

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2318-13-54

ABSTRACT: Background: People with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently have low activity levels, poor mobility and reduced quality of life. Although increased physical activity may improve mobility, balance and wellbeing, adherence to exercises and activity programs over the longer term can be challenging, particularly for older people with progressive neurological conditions such as PD. Physical activities that are engaging and enjoyable, such as dancing, might enhance adherence over the long term. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial of Irish set dancing compared with routine physiotherapy for people with mild to moderately severe PD. Methods. Twenty-four people with idiopathic PD referred for movement rehabilitation were randomized to receive standard physiotherapy exercises or Irish set dancing classes once per week plus a weekly home program for 6 months (12 in each group). The feasibility and safety of the proposed RCT protocol was the main focus of this evaluation. The primary outcome was motor disability measured by the motor component of the UPDRS, which was assessed prior to and after therapy by trained assessors blinded to group assignment. The Timed Up and Go, the Berg Balance Scale and the modified Freezing of Gait Questionnaire were secondary measures. Quality of life of the people with PD was evaluated using the PDQ-39. Results: Both the Irish set dancing and physiotherapy exercise program were shown to be feasible and safe. There were no differences between groups in the rate of adverse events such as falls, serious injuries, death or rates of admission to hospital. The physiotherapists who provided usual care remained blind to group allocation, with no change in their standard clinical practice. Compliance and adherence to both the exercise and dance programs were very high and attrition rates were low over the 6 months of therapy. Although improvements were made in both groups, the dance group showed superior results to standard physiotherapy in relation to freezing of gait, balance and motor disability. Conclusions: Irish dancing and physiotherapy were both safe and feasible in this sample from Venice, with good adherence over a comparatively long time period of 6 months. A larger multi-centre trial is now warranted to establish whether Irish set dancing is more effective than routine physiotherapy for enhancing mobility, balance and quality of life in people living with idiopathic PD. Trial registration. EudraCT number 2012-005769-11. © 2013 Volpe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Houston, S., McGill, A.

A mixed-methods study into ballet for people living with Parkinson's

(2013) Arts and Health, 5 (2), pp. 103-119. Cited 20 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84881301402&doi=10.1080%2f17533015.2012.745580&partnerID=40&md5=8e2fca9e4fccbbcf1dbad86714f997da

 

DOI: 10.1080/17533015.2012.745580

ABSTRACT: Background: Parkinson's is a neurological disease that is physically debilitating and can be socially isolating. Dance is growing in popularity for people with Parkinson's and claims have been made for its benefits. The paper details a mixed-methods study that examined a 12-week dance project for people with Parkinson's, led by English National Ballet. Methods: The effects on balance, stability and posture were measured through the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and a plumb-line analysis. The value of participation and movement quality were interpreted through ethnographic methods, grounded theory and Effort analysis. Results: Triangulation of results indicates that people were highly motivated, with 100% adherence, and valued the classes as an important part of their lives. Additionally, results indicated an improvement in balance and stability, although not in posture. Conclusions: Dancing may offer benefit to people with Parkinson's through its intellectual, artistic, social and physical aspects. The paper suggests that a range of research methods is fundamental to capture the importance of a multifaceted activity, such as dance, to those with Parkinson's. © 2013 Copyright Sara Houston and Ashley McGill.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Srinivasan, S.M., Bhat, A.N.

A review of "music and movement" therapies for children with autism: Embodied interventions for multisystem development

(2013) Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, (MAR), . Cited 17 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84875521941&doi=10.3389%2ffnint.2013.00022&partnerID=40&md5=9e54837257c917734ef9ebac4acf3d37

 

DOI: 10.3389/fnint.2013.00022

ABSTRACT: The rising incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) has led to a surge in the number of children needing autism interventions. This paper is a call to clinicians to diversify autism interventions and to promote the use of embodied music-based approaches to facilitate multisystem development. Approximately 12% of all autism interventions and 45% of all alternative treatment strategies in schools involve music-based activities. Evidence suggests that musical training significantly impacts various forms of development including communication, social-emotional, motor, and behavioral development, in children with ASDs, typically developing individuals, and children with other neurological disabilities such as dyslexia and intellectual disabilities. In this review, we first highlight mechanisms and evidence for how music and movement interventions can enhance communication, social-emotional, behavioral, and motor skills in individuals with autism. We will support our claims by reviewing results from brain imaging studies in children with autism that provide neuroanatomical evidence for the effects of music therapies in autism. We will also discuss the critical elements and the different types of music therapy approaches commonly used in pediatric neurological populations including autism. We provide strong arguments for the use of music and movement interventions as a multisystem treatment tool for children with ASDs. Finally, we also make recommendations for assessment and treatment of children with ASDs, and provide directions for future research. © 2013 Bhat and Srinivasan.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Foster, E.R., Golden, L., Duncan, R.P., Earhart, G.M.

Community-based argentine tango dance program is associated with increased activity participation among individuals with parkinson's disease

(2013) Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94 (2), pp. 240-249. Cited 49 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84872849902&doi=10.1016%2fj.apmr.2012.07.028&partnerID=40&md5=f26ca82f047856f6ad3190752df5b0e3

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.07.028

ABSTRACT: Objective: To determine the effects of a 12-month community-based tango dance program on activity participation among individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Design: Randomized controlled trial with assessment at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Setting: Intervention was administered in the community; assessments were completed in a university laboratory. Participants: Volunteers with PD (n=62) enrolled in the study and were randomized to a treatment group; 10 participants did not receive the allocated intervention, and therefore the final analyzed sample included 52 participants. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to the tango group, which involved 12 months of twice-weekly Argentine tango dance classes, or to the no intervention control group (n=26 per group). Main Outcome Measure: Current, new, and retained participation in instrumental, leisure, and social activities, as measured by the Activity Card Sort (with the dance activity removed). Results: Total current participation in the tango group was higher at 3, 6, and 12 months compared with baseline (Ps≤.008), while the control group did not change (Ps≥.11). Total activity retention (since onset of PD) in the tango group increased from 77% to 90% (P=.006) over the course of the study, whereas the control group remained around 80% (P=.60). These patterns were similar in the separate activity domains. The tango group gained a significant number of new social activities (P=.003), but the control group did not (P=.71). Conclusions: Individuals with PD who participated in a community-based Argentine tango class reported increased participation in complex daily activities, recovery of activities lost since the onset of PD, and engagement in new activities. Incorporating dance into the clinical management of PD may benefit participation and subsequently quality of life for this population. © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Stoźek, J., Pustulka-Piwnik, U.

Using dance in the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's disease

(2013) Rehabilitacja Medyczna, 17 (1), pp. 21-25.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84901677744&partnerID=40&md5=94399928b6c3bcc334631230702c56e9

 

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease leading to the occurrence of movement disorders, postural instability, gait disorders, falls, non-motor symptoms and disability. Rehabilitation is an important component of multidisciplinary treatment in PD. The aim of the study is to present the benefits and effects of using dance in the rehabilitation of patients with PD. Dance can have a beneficial influence on the physical, psychological, emotional, intellectual, aesthetic, cultural and social spheres of human life. Positive effects, which can be obtained through regular dance classes, in particular when they accurately correspond to the therapeutic goals of rehabilitation in PD. Patients with PD benefit from dance training in the way other dancing individuals do. Dance training includes various postural, balance and gait exercises performed to rhythm and music. It uses strategies naturally used in dance which are particularly useful in the therapy of patients with PD: concentration on movement performed to music, imagination of movement before its execution, multisensory stimulation and using sensory cues. Music and dance facilitate the initiation of movement and its performance at a proper speed and amplitude. In the limited studies concerning the effects of dance rehabilitation programs on PD, positive results were obtained in balance, gait, functional status and the quality of patient life. The authors used various forms of dance: the elements of classical ballet, jazz dance, ballroom dancing, Argentine tango, group dances, folk dances, contemporary dance, contact improvisation, elements of choreography dance theatre. Dance in various forms can be the tool for multidisciplinary rehabilitation, joining the elements of physiotherapy, art therapy (dance and music therapy), rhythmic auditory stimulation as well as social integration. © WSA Bielsko-Biaa.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Bunce, J.

Dance movement therapy with patients with Parkinson’s disease

(2013) Dance Movement Therapy: Theory, Research and Practice, Second Edition, pp. 71-86. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84919554371&doi=10.4324%2f9780203641613&partnerID=40&md5=90335851222637d15f09cbe399233342

 

DOI: 10.4324/9780203641613

DOCUMENT TYPE: Book Chapter

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Cameron, I.G.M., Brien, D.C., Links, K., Robichaud, S., Ryan, J.D., Munoz, D.P., Chow, T.W.

Changes to saccade behaviors in parkinson's disease following dancing and observation of dancing

(2013) Frontiers in Neurology, 4 MAR, art. no. 22, . Cited 4 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84878782524&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2013.00022&partnerID=40&md5=60d068618ddc3ffbef25ead93587151a

 

DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2013.00022

ABSTRACT: Background: The traditional view of Parkinson's disease (PD) as a motor disorder only treated by dopaminergic medications is now shifting to include non-pharmacologic interventions. We have noticed that patients with PD obtain an immediate, short-lasting benefit to mobility by the end of a dance class, suggesting some mechanism by which dancing reduces bradykinetic symptoms. We have also found that patients with PD are unimpaired at initiating highly automatic eye movements to visual stimuli (pro-saccades) but are impaired at generating willful eye movements away from visual stimuli (anti-saccades). We hypothesized that the mechanisms by which a dance class improves movement initiation may generalize to the brain networks impacted in PD (frontal lobe and basal ganglia, BG), and thus could be assessed objectively by measuring eye movements, which rely on the same neural circuitry.Methods: Participants with PD performed pro- and anti-saccades before, and after, a dance class. "Before" and "after" saccade performance measurements were compared. These measurements were then contrasted with a control condition (observing a dance class in a video), and with older and younger adult populations, who rested for an hour between measurements.Results: We found an improvement in anti-saccade performance following the observation of dance (but not following dancing), but we found a detriment in pro-saccade performance following dancing. Conclusion: We suggest that observation of dance induced plasticity changes in frontal-BG networks that are important for executive control. Dancing, in contrast, increased voluntary movement signals that benefited mobility, but interfered with the automaticity of efficient pro-saccade execution. © 2013 Cameron, Brien, Links, Robichaud, Ryan, Munoz and Chow.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Chen, J.Y., Wang, E.A., Cepeda, C., Levine, M.S.

Dopamine imbalance in Huntington's disease: A mechanism for the lack of behavioral flexibility

(2013) Frontiers in Neuroscience, (7 JUL), art. no. Article 114, . Cited 42 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84887918899&doi=10.3389%2ffnins.2013.00114&partnerID=40&md5=4d6b56e6bb780ea6eb9bd7fd5c6d86af

 

DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2013.00114

ABSTRACT: Dopamine (DA) plays an essential role in the control of coordinated movements. Alterations in DA balance in the striatum lead to pathological conditions such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases (HD). HD is a progressive, invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a genetic mutation producing an expansion of glutamine repeats and is characterized by abnormal dance-like movements (chorea). The principal pathology is the loss of striatal and cortical projection neurons. Changes in brain DA content and receptor number contribute to abnormal movements and cognitive deficits in HD. In particular, during the early hyperkinetic stage of HD, DA levels are increased whereas expression of DA receptors is reduced. In contrast, in the late akinetic stage, DA levels are significantly decreased and resemble those of a Parkinsonian state. Time-dependent changes in DA transmission parallel biphasic changes in glutamate synaptic transmission and may enhance alterations in glutamate receptor-mediated synaptic activity. In this review, we focus on neuronal electrophysiological mechanisms that may lead to some of the motor and cognitive symptoms of HD and how they relate to dysfunction in DA neurotransmission. Based on clinical and experimental findings, we propose that some of the behavioral alterations in HD, including reduced behavioral flexibility, may be caused by altered DA modulatory function. Thus, restoring DA balance alone or in conjunction with glutamate receptor antagonists could be a viable therapeutic approach. © 2013 Chen, Wang, Cepeda and Levine.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Kiepe, M.-S., Stöckigt, B., Keil, T.

Effects of dance therapy and ballroom dances on physical and mental illnesses: A systematic review

(2012) Arts in Psychotherapy, 39 (5), pp. 404-411. Cited 13 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84864802642&doi=10.1016%2fj.aip.2012.06.001&partnerID=40&md5=21a0db9ad23ed48d344294921b2b5167

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.aip.2012.06.001

ABSTRACT: This systematic review aims to evaluate the effects of dance (movement) therapy and ballroom dances as therapeutic interventions for adults with physical and mental illnesses in comparison to other interventions or care as usual. A systematic literature search for randomized controlled trials examining dance therapy and ballroom dances published between 1995 and 2011 was carried out in the electronic databases MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 13 publications reporting results from 11 randomized trials (predominantly from USA and Scandinavia) were identified with mostly small samples. They examined breast cancer (n=2), dementia (n=1), Parkinson's disease (n=2), heart failure (n=1), diabetes type 2 (n=1), depression (n=3) and fibromyalgia (n=1). Dance (movement) therapy had a positive impact for patients with breast cancer, improving quality of life, shoulder range of motion and body image. In patients with depression psychological distress was reduced by dance therapy. Ballroom dances improved balance and coordination in patients with Parkinson's disease and disease-specific quality of life in patients with heart failure. Dance (movement) therapy and ballroom dances seem beneficial for patients with breast cancer, depression, Parkinson's disease, diabetes and heart failure. However, further good quality research is needed to gain more profound insight into the efficacy of these treatment options. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Tomlinson, C.L., Patel, S., Meek, C., Clarke, C.E., Stowe, R., Shah, L., Sackley, C.M., Deane, K.H., Herd, C.P., Wheatley, K., Ives, N.

Physiotherapy versus placebo or no intervention in Parkinson's disease.

(2012) Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), 7, pp. CD002817. Cited 84 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84865721752&partnerID=40&md5=f28e9fff942e508ccaeb943bd9ed21f6

 

ABSTRACT: Despite medical therapies and surgical interventions for Parkinson's disease (PD), patients develop progressive disability. The role of physiotherapy aims to maximise functional ability and minimise secondary complications through movement rehabilitation within a context of education and support for the whole person. The overall aim is to optimise independence, safety and well-being, thereby enhancing quality of life. To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy intervention compared with no intervention in patients with PD. We identified relevant trials by electronic searches of numerous literature databases (e.g. MEDLINE, EMBASE) and trial registers, plus handsearching of major journals, abstract books, conference proceedings and reference lists of retrieved publications. The literature search included trials published up to end of December 2010. Randomised controlled trials of physiotherapy intervention versus no physiotherapy intervention in patients with PD. Two review authors independently extracted data from each article. We used standard meta-analysis methods to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy intervention compared with no physiotherapy intervention. Trials were classified into the following intervention comparisons: general physiotherapy, exercise, treadmill training, cueing, dance and martial arts. We used tests for heterogeneity to assess for differences in treatment effect across these different physiotherapy interventions. We identified 33 trials with 1518 participants. Compared with no-intervention, physiotherapy significantly improved the gait outcomes of velocity (mean difference 0.05 m/s, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.02 to 0.07, P = 0.0002), two- or six-minute walk test (16.40 m, CI: 1.90 to 30.90, P = 0.03) and step length (0.03 m, CI: 0 to 0.06, P = 0.04); functional mobility and balance outcomes of Timed Up & Go test (-0.61 s, CI: -1.06 to -0.17, P = 0.006), Functional Reach Test (2.16 cm, CI: 0.89 to 3.43, P = 0.0008) and Berg Balance Scale (3.36 points, CI: 1.91 to 4.81, P < 0.00001); and clinician-rated disability using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) (total: -4.46 points, CI -7.16 to -1.75, P = 0.001; activities of daily living: -1.36, CI -2.41 to -0.30, P = 0.01; and motor: -4.09, CI: -5.59 to -2.59, P < 0.00001). There was no difference between arms in falls or patient-rated quality of life. Indirect comparisons of the different physiotherapy interventions found no evidence that the treatment effect differed across the physiotherapy interventions for any of the outcomes assessed. Benefit for physiotherapy was found in most outcomes over the short-term (i.e. < three months), but was only significant for velocity, two- or six-minute walk test, step length, Timed Up & Go, Functional Reach Test, Berg Balance Scale and clinician-rated UPDRS. Most of the observed differences between the treatments were small. However, for some outcomes (e.g. velocity, Berg Balance Scale and UPDRS), the differences observed were at, or approaching, what are considered minimally clinical important changes.The review illustrates that a wide range of approaches are employed by physiotherapists to treat PD. However, there was no evidence of differences in treatment effect between the different types of physiotherapy interventions being used, though this was based on indirect comparisons. There is a need to develop a consensus menu of 'best-practice' physiotherapy, and to perform large well-designed randomised controlled trials to demonstrate the longer-term efficacy and cost-effectiveness of 'best practice' physiotherapy in PD.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Kluge, M.A., Tang, A., Glick, L., LeCompte, M., Willis, B.

Let's Keep Moving: A dance movement class for older women recently relocated to a continuing care retirement community (CCRC)

(2012) Arts and Health, 4 (1), pp. 4-15. Cited 3 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84865775218&doi=10.1080%2f17533015.2010.551717&partnerID=40&md5=9aca4fd243bd1bfbff31e9e8c91d1097

 

DOI: 10.1080/17533015.2010.551717

ABSTRACT: Objective: The purpose of this study was to understand what is was like for older women (78-92 years of age) who recently relocated to a continuing care retirement community (CCRC) to participate in a five-week dance/dance movement therapy (DMT) class called Let's Keep Moving. Dance andDMThave many quality of life benefits for a range of populations (i.e. people with Parkinson's disease) but little is known about how dance/DMT might be beneficial for older adults as they adjust to relocation. Method: A phenomenological case method approach was selected to guide this study. Data were collected and triangulated from videotaped footage and field notes taken of the dance class and from focus group interviews with participants. Analysis revealed themes that had both structural and meaning units. Results: Being special and belonging, realizing a new and improved self, and moving better and feeling better were associated gains for participants. Having a teacher who was an authentic role model and provided inspiration was important/motivating to participants as well. Conclusions: Participation in dance/ DMTappears to help older women reduce relocation stress by fostering personal growth and social connectivity. Moreover, the precepts of Newman's Health as Expanding Consciousness appear to have utility in guiding thinking about health and quality of life for the old-old who are relocating to CRCCs. © 2012 Taylor & Francis.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Bräuninger, I.

The efficacy of dance movement therapy group on improvement of quality of life: A randomized controlled trial

(2012) Arts in Psychotherapy, 39 (4), pp. 296-303. Cited 13 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84861849006&doi=10.1016%2fj.aip.2012.03.008&partnerID=40&md5=a53ca7d86cf7fdc5136cd344ed08159b

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.aip.2012.03.008

ABSTRACT: This study examines the treatment outcome of a ten weeks dance movement therapy intervention on quality of life (QOL). The multicentred study used a subject-design with pre-test, post-test, and six months follow-up test. 162 participants who suffered from stress were randomly assigned to the dance movement therapy treatment group (TG) (n= 97) and the wait-listed control group (WG) (65). The World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire 100 (WHOQOL-100) and Munich Life Dimension List were used in both groups at all three measurement points. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed that dance movement therapy participants in all QOL dimensions always more than the WG. In the short term, they significantly improved in the Psychological domain (p> .001, WHOQOL; p> .01, Munich Life Dimension List), Social relations/life (p> .10, WHOQOL; p> .10, Munich Life Dimension List), Global value (p> .05, WHOQOL), Physical health (p> .05, Munich Life Dimension List), and General life (p> .10, Munich Life Dimension List). In the long term, dance movement therapy significantly enhanced the psychological domain (p> .05, WHOQOL; p> .05, Munich Life Dimension List), Spirituality (p> .10, WHOQOL), and General life (p> .05, Munich Life Dimension List). Dance movement therapy is effective in the short- and long-term to improve QOL. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Valverde Guijarro, E., Flórez García, M.T.

Effect of dancing on Parkinson's disease patients [Efecto de la danza en los enfermos de Parkinson]

(2012) Fisioterapia, 34 (5), pp. 216-224.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84865730955&doi=10.1016%2fj.ft.2012.03.006&partnerID=40&md5=89d43112d5b1cdc693985cc651f7eeac

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ft.2012.03.006

ABSTRACT: Motor skill disorders are one of the most important symptoms and that which most affect the quality of life of Parkinson's Disease patients. Dance, as artistic and therapy activity, can help in the rehabilitation of neuromuscular disorders and motor skills.This review has aimed to make a comprehensive assessment of studies investigating whether dance favors the rehabilitation of Parkinson's Disease patients.A total of 13 trials with 384 participants were included. Four different styles of dance were evaluated. They showed favorable results on parameters such as physical function, balance, gait, fall risk and quality of life.Although there are few clinical trials, the analysis of the results suggest that dance can improve the rehabilitation of motor disorders since a decrease in the risk of falls because balance and gait are improved is observed. All of this help entail an improvement in the quality of life. © 2011 Asociación Española de Fisioterapeutas.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Short Survey

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Mettner, J.

Small steps.

(2012) Minnesota medicine, 95 (7), pp. 10-11.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84866936783&partnerID=40&md5=b87d1b3d63ae3b2a502352f792493e56

 

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Barbieri, F.A., Rinaldi, N.M., Santos, P.C.R., Lirani-Silva, E., Vitório, R., Teixeira-Arroyo, C., Stella, F., Gobbi, L.T.B.

Functional capacity of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): Relationship between clinical characteristics and disease severity

(2012) Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 54 (2), pp. e83-e88. Cited 6 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84857058216&doi=10.1016%2fj.archger.2011.07.008&partnerID=40&md5=f54a31fb49d454654b2e4c3351b1746f

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.archger.2011.07.008

ABSTRACT: The present study had three objectives: (a) to characterize the functional capacity of patients with PD, (b) to assess the relationship between the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics and disease severity, and (c) to compare the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics according to disease severity. The study included 54 patients with idiopathic PD who were distributed into two groups according to PD severity: unilateral group (n= 35); and bilateral group (n= 19). All patients underwent psychiatric assessment by means of the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging of PD, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively), and The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The physical fitness components of functional capacity were evaluated over a 2-day period, using recommendations by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regressions were calculated to test the correlation between functional capacity and clinical characteristics, and to predict clinical scores from physical performance, respectively. Clinical variables and physical component data were compared between groups using analysis of variance to determine the effects of disease severity. Patients with advanced disease showed low levels of functional capacity. Interestingly, patients with good functional capacity in one of the physical fitness components also showed good capacities in the other components. Disease severity is a major factor affecting functional capacity and clinical characteristics. Medical providers should take disease severity into consideration when prescribing physical activity for PD patients, since the relationship between functional capacity and clinical characteristics is dependent on disease severity. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Duncan, R.P., Earhart, G.M.

Randomized controlled trial of community-based dancing to modify disease progression in Parkinson disease

(2012) Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 26 (2), pp. 132-143. Cited 87 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84856321318&doi=10.1177%2f1545968311421614&partnerID=40&md5=49e80dad065f2f7ba6dc994861f0e57f

 

DOI: 10.1177/1545968311421614

ABSTRACT: Background. Tango dancing has been effective in improving measures of physical function in people with Parkinson disease (PD). However, all previous studies were institution-based, tested participants on medication, and employed short-term interventions. Objective. To determine the effects of a 12-month community-based tango program for individuals withPD on disease severity and physical function. Methods. Sixty-two participants were randomly assigned to a twice weekly, community-based Argentine Tango program or a Control group (no intervention). Participants were assessed off anti- Parkinson medication at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. The primary outcome measure was the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale 3 (MDS-UPDRS-3). Secondary outcome measures were the MDS-UPDRS-1, MDS-UPDRS-2, MiniBESTest balance test; Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q); 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT); gait velocity for comfortable forward, fast as possible forward, dual task, and backward walking; and Nine-Hole Peg Test (9HPT). Results. Groups were not different at baseline. Overall, the Tango group improved whereas the Control group showed little change on most measures. For the MDS-UPDRS-3, there was no significant change in the Control group from baseline to 12 months, whereas the Tango group had a reduction of 28.7% (12.8 points). There were significant group by time interactions for MDS-UPDRS-3, MiniBESTest, FOG-Q, 6MWT, forward and dual task walking velocities, and 9HPT in favor of the dance group. Conclusions. Improvements in the Tango group were apparent off medication, suggesting that long-term participation in tango may modify progression of disability in PD. © The Author(s) 2012.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

de Dreu, M.J., van der Wilk, A.S.D., Poppe, E., Kwakkel, G., van Wegen, E.E.H.

Rehabilitation, exercise therapy and music in patients with Parkinson's disease: A meta-analysis of the effects of music-based movement therapy on walking ability, balance and quality of life

(2012) Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, 18 (SUPPL. 1), pp. S114-S119. Cited 78 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84858675720&partnerID=40&md5=c27e78c7bceb487c1ca90520390f3cfc

 

ABSTRACT: Recent evidence suggests that music-based movement (MbM) therapy may be a promising intervention to improve gait and gait-related activities in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, because it naturally combines cognitive movement strategies, cueing techniques, balance exercises and physical activity while focussing on the enjoyment of moving on music instead of the current mobility limitations of the patient. A meta-analysis of RCTs on the efficacy of MbM-therapy, including individual rhythmic music training and partnered dance classes, was performed. Identified studies (K = 6) were evaluated on methodological quality, and summary effect sizes (SES) were calculated. Studies were generally small (total N= 168). Significant homogeneous SESs were found for the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go test and stride length (SESs: 4.1, 2.2, 0.11; P-values &lt;0.01; I 2 0, 0, 7%, respectively). A sensitivity analysis on type of MbM-therapy (dance- or gait-related interventions) revealed a significant improvement in walking velocity for gait-related MbM-therapy, but not for dance-related MbM-therapy. No significant effects were found for UPDRS-motor score, Freezing of Gait and Quality of Life. Overall, MbM-therapy appears promising for the improvement of gait and gait-related activities in PD. Future studies should incorporate larger groups and focus on long-term compliance and follow-up. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Sorianoa, C.T., Batson, G.

Dance-making for adults with Parkinson disease: One teacher's process of constructing a modern dance class

(2011) Research in Dance Education, 12 (3), pp. 323-337.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-80053333441&doi=10.1080%2f14647893.2011.614334&partnerID=40&md5=1bdc37bf6fe8a56ccc17e7275ba74c6b

 

DOI: 10.1080/14647893.2011.614334

ABSTRACT: Within the last decade, research has supported the use of dance for people with Parkinson disease to improve health and wellbeing. While the majority of study findings have been positive for a variety of psychophysical outcomes (gait, mobility, and balance confidence, for example,), little has been reported in regard to the process of selecting class content. This paper describes one teacher's process of action research in developing a program in modern dance for a small group of adults with Parkinson disease and their spouses. The program was generated as collaborative pilot research to identify variables within modern dance that could be more rigorously examined and applied in future studies. Here the dance teacher describes her rationale and outlines the components of the class structure as a means of stimulating dialogue on a designing community-based dance curriculum for this population. Generating such dialogue will contribute to the developing body of literature in dance curriculum research. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Heiberger, L., Maurer, C., Amtage, F., Mendez-Balbuena, I., Schulte-Mönting, J., Hepp-Reymond, M.-C., Kristeva, R.

Impact of a weekly dance class on the functional mobility and on the quality of life of individuals with Parkinson's disease

(2011) Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 3 (OCT), pp. 1-15. Cited 32 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84859724570&doi=10.3389%2ffnagi.2011.00014&partnerID=40&md5=0e0f5fc70329b78d8a6a81496d0dd6f3

 

DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2011.00014

ABSTRACT: Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) mainly suffer from motor impairments which increase the risk of falls and lead to a decline of quality of life. Several studies investigated the long-term effect of dance for people with PD. The aims of the present study were to investigate (i) the short-term effects of dance (i.e., the effect immediately after the dance class) on motor control in individuals with PD and (ii) the long-term effects of 8 months of participation in the weekly dance class on the quality of life of the PD patients and their caregivers. The dance lessons took place in a ballet studio and were led by a professional dancer. Eleven people with moderate to severe PD (58-85years old) were subjected to a motor and quality of life assessments. With respect to the motor assessments the unified Parkinson disease rating scale III (UPDRS III), the timed up and go test (TUG), and the Semitandem test (SeTa) before and after the dance class were used. With respect to the quality of life and well-being we applied quality of life scale (QOLS) as well as the Westheimer questionnaire. Additionally, we asked the caregivers to fill out the Questionnaire for caregivers. We found a significant beneficial short-term effect for the total score of the UPDRS motor score. The strongest improvements were in rigidity scores followed by significant improvements in hand movements, finger taps, and facial expression. No significant changes were found for TUG and for SeTa. The results of the questionnaires showed positive effects of the dance class on social life, health, body-feeling and mobility, and on everyday life competences of the PD patients. Beneficial effect was also found for the caregivers. The findings demonstrate that dance has beneficial effect on the functional mobility of individuals with PD. Further, dance improves the quality of life of the patients and their caregivers. Dance may lead to better therapeutic strategies as it is engaging and enjoyable. © 2011 Heiberger, Maurer, Amtage, Mendez-Balbuena, Schulte-Mönting, Hepp-Reymond and Kristeva.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Shneyder, N., Borazanci, A., Reddy, A., Gaitour, E., Minagar, A., Jaffe, S.L.

Movement Disorders and Pregnancy

(2011) Neurological Disorders and Pregnancy, pp. 123-133.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84882868183&doi=10.1016%2fB978-0-12-384911-3.00007-5&partnerID=40&md5=eb46583191ba1127aaa8f8f963373435

 

DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-384911-3.00007-5

ABSTRACT: This chapter reviews latest studies concerning pregnancy and movement disorders. Pregnancy may uncover a pre-existing movement disorder tendency such as for the development of chorea, or pregnant patients may develop chorea gravidarum (CG). Moreover, pregnancy can have variable effects on the clinical manifestations of such movement disorders as Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that clinically presents with rigidity, resting tremor, bradykinesia, flexed posture, and loss of corrective postural reflexes. Other associated diseases are Huntington's disease, dystonia, essential tremor, Wilson's disease, restless legs syndrome, Tourette's syndrome. Chorea (derived from the Latin word choreus meaning "dance") is a form of movement disorder that consists of irregular, involuntary, brief, and unpredictable movements resulting from continuous flow of random muscle contractions from one body part to another, whereas Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder with complete penetrance. In addition, restless legs syndrome, also known as Ekbom syndrome, is the most frequent movement disorder associated with pregnancy and affects up to 23% of pregnancies, usually in the third trimester. Clinically, RLS is characterized by the presence of paresthesias or dysesthesias occurring mainly in the lower extremities associated with an irresistible urge to move the legs. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Book Chapter

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Schneider, K.

Dancing with patients - What happens when people who, for instance, suffer from Parkinson's disease dance? [Mit patienten tanzen - Was passiert, wenn menschen tanzen, die etwa an Parkinson leiden?]

(2011) Tanz, (JAHRBUCH), pp. 90-93.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-80052720748&partnerID=40&md5=03e5be81d6d78995c5f108b1ff51feb3

 

DOCUMENT TYPE: Short Survey

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Karila, L., Reynaud, M.

GHB and synthetic cathinones: Clinical effects and potential consequences

(2011) Drug Testing and Analysis, 3 (9), pp. 552-559. Cited 48 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-80053422684&doi=10.1002%2fdta.210&partnerID=40&md5=c23629658505f63543cf454e82ab451e

 

DOI: 10.1002/dta.210

ABSTRACT: Designer drugs belong to a group of legally or illegally produced substances that are structurally and pharmacologically very similar to illicit drugs. In the past, designer drugs were often used during all-night dance parties, but they are now consumed in multiple settings from college bars to parks to private house parties. Most of these club drugs can be bought on legal websites and home-delivered for private parties. Recently, legal highs have once again become a burning media issue across the world. Our review will focus on GHB and synthetic cathinones. Literature searches were conducted for the period from 1975 to July 2010 using PubMed, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Internet underground and governmental websites using the following keywords alone or in combination: designer drugs, club drugs, party drugs, GHB, synthetic cathinones, mephedrone, methylone, flephedrone, MDAI, and MDVP. Available epidemiological, neurobiological, and clinical data for each compound are described. There is evidence that negative health and social consequences may occur in recreational and chronic users. The addictive potential of designer drugs is not weak. Non-fatal overdoses and deaths related to GHB/GBL or synthetic cathinones have been reported. Clinicians must be careful with GBL or synthetic cathinones, which are being sold and used as substitutes for GHB and MDMA, respectively. Interventions for drug prevention and harm reduction in response to the use of these drugs should be implemented on the Internet and in recreational settings. Prevention, Information, Action, and Treatment are the main goals that must be addressed for this new potentially addictive problem. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Ransmayr, G.

Physical, occupational, speech and swallowing therapies and physical exercise in Parkinson's disease

(2011) Journal of Neural Transmission, 118 (5), pp. 773-781. Cited 13 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-79956225576&doi=10.1007%2fs00702-011-0622-9&partnerID=40&md5=159c7e34864c103b0a482882b3e9e5a1

 

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-011-0622-9

ABSTRACT: Former studies on the effects of physical exercise, physical and occupational therapy (PT, OT) and speech and swallowing therapy (ST, SwT) in Parkinson's disease (PD) have demonstrated little or uncertain effects. New pathophysiological concepts have been developed. Recent controlled high-level studies demonstrate improvement of mobility and balance after training of muscular strength and endurance, trunk control, and amplitude and rhythmicity of movements (treadmill). Attentional and cognitive strategies were found to enforce body awareness and improve movement sequences. Dance, sensory (auditory, visual, tactile) and cognitive cueing are effective for problems of gait and balance. Whether PT and OT reduce the risk of falls remains uncertain. ST including Lee Silverman Voice Treatment has been shown to relieve speech problems. SwT and OT are frequently applied, however, further studies are necessary. Therapeutic interventions need to be evaluated with regard to consistency, intensity, frequency, duration, side effects, home versus institution based and standardized versus individualized training, quality standards, practicability in real life, and cost-effectiveness. Parkinson patients should resume or continue physical exercise as long as possible. There is hope that regular sport may modify PD risk and progression. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Houston, S.

The methodological challenges of research into dance for people with Parkinson's

(2011) Dance Research, 29 (2), pp. 329-351. Cited 5 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84883842818&doi=10.3366%2fdrs.2011.0023&partnerID=40&md5=978ddd0534461fc4bc3acd6e3420314f

 

DOI: 10.3366/drs.2011.0023

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's is a neurodegenerative disease that affects one in 500 people. It is a condition that affects the ability to initiate movement, to keep movement going and to stop movement voluntarily. Often, symptoms manifest themselves as limb tremors, rigidity of muscles, slowness of movement, a lack of co-ordination and difficulty in balancing. Many people with Parkinson's fall regularly and many feel socially isolated. There is no cure, and drugs to alleviate symptoms can be unreliable, sometimes even resulting in involuntary movement (dyskinesia) and hallucinations.

There is a small but growing network of dance practitioners who deliver group dance sessions to those with Parkinson's. Evidence suggests that temporary relief of some symptoms is afforded by dancing to music and that dancing aids some people with Parkinson's to cope better with everyday actions. Most dance practitioners, however, approach sessions as a way for people to engage in an artistic and social practice. This paper was written at the start of a mixed-methods research project carried out in conjunction with English National Ballet, whose Department of Learning piloted twelve dance sessions for people with Parkinson's based on Nureyev's Romeo and Juliet. It discusses the tension between characterising dance as a rehabilitative therapy and perceiving it as an artistic and social practice.

Most Parkinson's research has focused on finding a cure through neurological, biomechanical and pharmaceutical explorations. There has also been a reliance on numerical data for quality of life reports. In addition, the majority of research examining dance for people with Parkinson's has used quantitative methods and has focused on clinical benefits afforded by dance. The dominance of, and perceived need for, 'hard' scientific research methods and analysis prove a challenge to the qualitative researcher, who comes with a different viewpoint on how we know and understand the world, and with different ways of researching. The paper will argue that a dance researcher with a different methodological base can also offer potentially useful insight into the individuals who have this neurological condition, an insight different to that offered by quantitative research. Using sociological tools, such as interview and observation techniques, the qualitative researcher may examine participants' lived experience of dancing with a body that moves in an unpredictable and atypical manner, as well as analysing the context in which this experience takes place. There is a need to focus attention on the dancing person, rather than merely on his or her disease.

The paper reviews the literature on dance for people with Parkinson's, as well as outlining the traditional methodologies used to examine the disease and its symptoms. In doing so, it identifies the gaps in knowledge that could be explored through qualitative approaches, as well as how such approaches may be of use in strengthening ideas proposed by scientific methods. Through scoping arguments made by disability studies scholars, the paper goes on to advocate for a qualitative approach that critically engages with context, language and actions, but that also acknowledges the materiality of the body. By placing the person and his or her experiences at the centre of research, it argues that a qualitative study is well placed to examine how a person can ascribe value to dance as an artistic and social practice, while attempting to cope with a debilitating condition through dancing. © Society for Dance Research.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Young-Mason, J.

Art, body, and soul: A conversation with dancers David Leventhal and John Heginbotham

(2010) Clinical Nurse Specialist, 24 (6), pp. 323-326.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77958564048&doi=10.1097%2fNUR.0b013e3181f9015d&partnerID=40&md5=0a0ddbeba4d7f2d1916277f3d563fb10

 

DOI: 10.1097/NUR.0b013e3181f9015d

DOCUMENT TYPE: Note

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Dowie, M.J., Scotter, E.L., Molinari, E., Glass, M.

The therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in Huntington's disease

(2010) Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 128 (2), pp. 305-323. Cited 8 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77957018891&doi=10.1016%2fj.pharmthera.2010.07.008&partnerID=40&md5=58e4e1366d5dcdece02a4a375b3bfa42

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.pharmthera.2010.07.008

ABSTRACT: Huntington's disease is a late-onset autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease characterised by increased symptom severity over time and ultimately premature death. An expanded CAG repeat sequence in the huntingtin gene leads to a polyglutamine expansion in the expressed protein, resulting in complex dysfunctions including cellular excitotoxicity and transcriptional dysregulation. Symptoms include cognitive deficits, psychiatric changes and a movement disorder often referred to as Huntington's chorea, which involves characteristic involuntary dance-like writhing movements. Neuropathologically Huntington's disease is characterised by neuronal dysfunction and death in the striatum and cortex with an overall decrease in cerebral volume (Ho et al., 2001). Neuronal dysfunction begins prior to symptom presentation, and cells of particular vulnerability include the striatal medium spiny neurons. Huntington's is a devastating disease for patients and their families and there is currently no cure, or even an effective therapy for disease symptoms. G-protein coupled receptors are the most abundant receptor type in the central nervous system and are linked to complex downstream pathways, manipulation of which may have therapeutic application in many neurological diseases. This review will highlight the potential of G-protein coupled receptor drug targets as emerging therapies for Huntington's disease. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Marchant, D., Sylvester, J.L., Earhart, G.M.

Effects of a short duration, high dose contact improvisation dance workshop on Parkinson disease: A pilot study

(2010) Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 18 (5), pp. 184-190. Cited 26 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-78149358246&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2010.07.004&partnerID=40&md5=6bc41f89b0eb5acfdf64544ba0d6ac59

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2010.07.004

ABSTRACT: Objectives: This study explored the feasibility and possible benefits of contact improvisation (CI) as an exercise intervention for individuals with PD. Design: This was an uncontrolled pilot study. Intervention: Eleven people with PD (H&Y. =2.4 ± 0.4) participated in a workshop of 10 1.5-h CI classes over 2 weeks, dancing with previously trained student CI dancers. Main outcome measures: Measures of disease severity, balance, functional mobility, and gait were compared 1 week before and after the workshop. Results: Participants demonstrated improvements on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale-Motor Subsection and Berg balance scores, along with increased swing and decreased stance percentages during walking. Backward step length also increased. Participants expressed a high level of enjoyment and interest in taking future CI classes. Conclusions: This pilot study supports the feasibility of CI as an intervention to address mobility limitations associated with PD. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Rabbia, J.

Dance as a community-based exercise in older adults

(2010) Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, 26 (4), pp. 353-360. Cited 3 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-78649242959&doi=10.1097%2fTGR.0b013e3181fee5cc&partnerID=40&md5=295c82cd2c797082d422f6ecf8c8d371

 

DOI: 10.1097/TGR.0b013e3181fee5cc

ABSTRACT: Dance as exercise may promote adherence to exercise and provide benefits similar to other forms of exercise. However, dance has not been rigorously studied; therefore, the evidence is generally of low quality involving small sample sizes and no control group. This article discusses the evidence for the benefits of dance involving people with dementia, rheumatoid arthritis (Class III), Parkinson's disease, diabetes, and on fall risk. A description of a local dance class for individuals with Parkinsons disease is described with recommendations for community-based dance classes. Copyright © 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Earhart, G.M.

Recommendations for implementing tango classes for persons with Parkinson disease

(2010) American Journal of Dance Therapy, 32 (1), pp. 41-52. Cited 21 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77952672790&doi=10.1007%2fs10465-010-9086-y&partnerID=40&md5=3b8445f401fcc6c2f91f1ef267614246

 

DOI: 10.1007/s10465-010-9086-y

ABSTRACT: Several studies have recently been published regarding the physical and emotional benefits of Argentine tango dance for individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). These papers focused on the effects of tango interventions rather than methods used to implement and deliver the interventions. The focus of the present paper is on methods for implementing PD-specific tango programs, to facilitate safe and appropriate implementation of community-based partnered dance programs for this population. We report successful methods for an Argentine Tango-based class, but these recommendations could be applicable to other partnered dances. © American Dance Therapy Association 2010.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Earhart, G.M.

Effects of dance on gait and balance in Parkinsons disease: A comparison of partnered and nonpartnered dance movement

(2010) Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 24 (4), pp. 384-392. Cited 84 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77951109223&doi=10.1177%2f1545968309353329&partnerID=40&md5=61bd118f31d6bffb1d2e07fafd536dcc

 

DOI: 10.1177/1545968309353329

ABSTRACT: Partnered tango dance can improve balance and gait in individuals with Parkinsons disease (PD). Partnered dance may allow these individuals to challenge balance more than nonpartnered dance. Alternatively, partnered practice could reduce balance gains because the participant may rely on the partner as a balance aid when challenged. The authors compared the effects of partnered and nonpartnered dance on balance and mobility in 39 people (11 women) with mild-moderate PD (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-III). Participants were randomly assigned to partnered or nonpartnered tango and attended 1-hour classes twice per week, completing 20 lessons within 10 weeks. Balance and gait were evaluated in the weeks immediately before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention. Both groups significantly improved on the Berg Balance Scale, comfortable and fast-as-possible walking velocity, and cadence. Improvements were maintained at the 1-month follow-up. The nonpartnered class improved as much as the partnered class; however, partnered participants expressed more enjoyment and interest in continuing. © The Author(s) 2010.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Batson, G.

Feasibility of an intensive trial of modern dance for adults with parkinson disease

(2010) Complementary Health Practice Review, 15 (2), pp. 65-83. Cited 20 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84857739545&doi=10.1177%2f1533210110383903&partnerID=40&md5=aeba751037f3a28bc7c09db0e190ccd6

 

DOI: 10.1177/1533210110383903

ABSTRACT: Although preliminary evidence supports the psychophysical benefits of dance for adults with Parkinson disease, guidelines for community-based dance programs await further scrutiny for safety and efficacy. This pilot study was designed to assess the feasibility of an intensive trial of group-delivered modern dance for 11 adults with early-to-middle stage Parkinson's. The Timed "Up and Goa" test and the Fullerton Advanced Balance scale were administered to assess balance safety and re-administered at closure along with a self-reported feedback questionnaire. Video recordings were analyzed for qualitative behavioral change. Pre/posttest comparisons from the Timed "Up and Goa" test were not significant, while those from the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale were significant at the .05 level for the group as a whole (p = .01) with an average score change of +3.1 points. Although qualitative results generally concurred with the social benefits associated with an enjoyable form of expressive exercise, important indicators surfaced bearing on future research and community program designs. These include need for more rigorous stratification of participants and adapting dance class structure to address specific group needs to promote motor learning for sustained functional gains. © The Author(s) 2010.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Earhart, G.M.

Effects of dance on balance and gait in severe Parkinson disease: A case study

(2010) Disability and Rehabilitation, 32 (8), pp. 679-684. Cited 33 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77749271054&doi=10.3109%2f09638280903247905&partnerID=40&md5=da8cd2d44c8dc5c5323cc7d595fa385c

 

DOI: 10.3109/09638280903247905

ABSTRACT: Purpose. Dance may improve functional mobility in individuals with mild-to-moderate Parkinson disease (PD), yet dance effects in severe PD remain unexamined. This study's purpose was to evaluate the feasibility and effects of partnered tango classes on balance, endurance and quality of life in an individual with severe PD. Design. Over 10 weeks, the participant attended 20, 1-h tango classes for individuals with PD. Balance, walking, and quality of life were evaluated before and after the intervention and at a 1-month follow-up in this single case design. Caregiver burden was also assessed at all time points. Results. The participant improved on the Berg Balance Scale, 6-min walk test, and functional reach. He reported increased balance confidence and improved quality of life as measured by the Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index. Gains were maintained at the 1-month follow-up. Caregiver burden increased from baseline immediately post-intervention and at follow-up. Conclusion. Twenty partnered tango lessons improved balance, endurance, balance confidence, and quality of life in a participant with severe PD. This is the first report of the use of dance as rehabilitation for an individual with advanced disease who primarily used a wheelchair for transportation. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Young-Mason, J.

Update: Music and dance bring hope to those with parkinson disease

(2010) Clinical Nurse Specialist, 24 (2), pp. 113-114. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77649133929&doi=10.1097%2fNUR.0b013e3181cf5588&partnerID=40&md5=3c589acf54da0fc5a3581a0a7f5f1392

 

DOI: 10.1097/NUR.0b013e3181cf5588

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Feldman, S.

The referral dance: Improving the interface between primary care practitioners and specialists caring for patients with dementia

(2009) American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias, 23 (6), pp. 513-515. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-58149178950&doi=10.1177%2f1533317508327439&partnerID=40&md5=b2bdd5c2c0eaf0dc8f520d1ea9300118

 

DOI: 10.1177/1533317508327439

DOCUMENT TYPE: Editorial

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Earhart, G.M.

Health-related quality of life and alternative forms of exercise in Parkinson disease

(2009) Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, 15 (9), pp. 644-648. Cited 81 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-70350155252&doi=10.1016%2fj.parkreldis.2009.03.003&partnerID=40&md5=cc920823a3b5de1079a23fb2f6d7e449

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2009.03.003

ABSTRACT: Parkinson disease (PD) reduces health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but exercise may improve HRQoL. This pilot study compared the effects of Tango, Waltz/Foxtrot, Tai Chi and No Intervention on HRQoL in individuals with PD. Seventy-five persons with PD (Hoehn and Yahr I-III) were assigned to 20 lessons of Tango, Waltz/Foxtrot, Tai Chi, or an untreated No Intervention group. Participants completed the PDQ-39 before and after participation in 20 classes or within 13 weeks in the case of the No Intervention group. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs determined differences between interventions. Tango significantly improved on mobility (p = 0.03), social support (p = 0.05) and the PDQ-39 SI (p < 0.01) at post-testing. No significant changes in HRQoL were noted in the Waltz/Foxtrot, Tai Chi or No Intervention. Tango may be helpful for improving HRQoL in PD because it addresses balance and gait deficits in the context of a social interaction that requires working closely with a partner. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Cabeza-Ruiz, R., De Dios Beas-Jiménez, J., Centeno-Prada Y, R.A., Orellana, J.N.

Sport aptitude test in active individuals with Down syndrome. Electrocardiographic findings [Examen de aptitud deportiva en jóvenes activos con síndrome de Down. Hallazgos electrocardiográficos]

(2009) Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte, 2 (2), pp. 52-55. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-70349572773&partnerID=40&md5=aacb1fcc6546756a2bd43759fa3b77bc

 

ABSTRACT: Objective. Analyze the findings and the usefulness of the resting electrocardiogram (ECG) in the recognition of physical fitness of athletes with Down syndrome (DS) according to the Federación Española de Medicina del Deporte (FEMEDE) 2007 Consensus. Methods. A total of 22 young active adults with DS (8 females and 14 males), aged 18 to 38 years (mean and standard deviation 27.7 ± 6.3 and 24.8 ± 5.2 years, respectively), were evaluated. The sports practiced were the following: dance, swimming, cycling and soccer. The medical examination for sports fitness included a resting ECG. The FEMEDE 2007 Consensus was used as the ECG diagnostic criteria. Results. Only 8 individuals in the sample (36.4%) had negative ECG according to the 2007 FEMEDE Consensus. The remainder (14 subjects) had between 1 to 3 electrocardiographic abnormalities. Thirteen of the fourteen volunteers who showed electrocardiographic findings revealed positive ECG criteria according to the FEMEDE 2007 Consensus, which led to additional studies to rule out diseases that contraindicated sports. Among the diagnoses, there was a long QT syndrome and three Wolf-Parkinson-White syndromes. Conclusions. Electrocardiographic abnormalities are common in athletes with DS, the existence of a rare disease that can trigger sudden death not being uncommon. We recommend conducting medical examination protocols for sports fitness to people with DS that include a resting ECG as a basic method for screening cardiac abnormalities that can evolve without SD. © 2008 Revista Andaluza de Medicina dei Deporte.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Earhart, G.M.

Short duration, intensive tango dancing for Parkinson disease: An uncontrolled pilot study

(2009) Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 17 (4), pp. 203-207. Cited 50 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-67650759592&doi=10.1016%2fj.ctim.2008.10.005&partnerID=40&md5=06cc56e9e4d54b33ba7635cfe17eb763

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2008.10.005

ABSTRACT: Objective: The goal of this pilot study was to determine the effects of short duration, intensive tango lessons on functional mobility in people with Parkinson disease. Design: This study employed a within-subject, prospective, repeated measures design. Subjects/patients: Fourteen people with idiopathic Parkinson disease participated. Setting: All balance and gait assessments were performed in a laboratory, but dance classes took place in a large, open classroom. Interventions: Participants completed ten 1.5-h long Argentine tango dance lessons within 2 weeks. Their balance, gait and mobility were assessed before and after the training sessions. Main outcome measures: Measures included the Berg Balance Scale, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, gait velocity, functional ambulation profile, step length, stance and single support percent of gait, Timed Up and Go, and the 6 min walk. Results: Participants significantly improved on the Berg Balance Scale (effect size (ES) = 0.83, p = 0.021), Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale Motor Subscale III (ES = -0.64, p = 0.029), and percent of time spent in stance during forward walking (ES = 0.97, p = 0.015). Non-significant improvements were noted on the Timed Up and Go (ES = -0.38, p = 0.220) and 6 min walk (ES = 0.35, p = 0.170). Conclusions: Frequent social dance lessons completed within a short time period appear to be appropriate and effective for these individuals with mild-moderately severe Parkinson disease. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Earhart, G.M.

Dance as therapy for individuals with Parkinson disease

(2009) European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, 45 (2), pp. 231-238. Cited 85 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-70349656977&partnerID=40&md5=22248dc7fd0f6b522f95b34dea0f98e0

 

ABSTRACT: Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative movement disorder that is often accompanied by impaired balance and walking and reduced quality of life (QoL). Recent studies indicate that dance may be an effective alternative to traditional exercise for addressing these areas of concern to individuals with PD. This review summarizes the relatively scant literature on the benefits of dance for those with PD, discusses what is currently known with respect to appropriate dosing of dance interventions, and speculates upon potential mechanisms by which dance may convey benefits. There is a clear need for additional research using larger sample sizes to examine the potential long-term effects of dance for those with PD.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Bereznai, B., Molnár, M.J.

Genetics and present therapy options in Parkinson's disease: A review [A parkinson-kór genetikája és aktuális terápiás lehetocombining double acute accentségei]

(2009) Ideggyogyaszati Szemle, 62 (5-6), pp. 155-163. Cited 3 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-67651064960&partnerID=40&md5=e08c6afe3809f10118186f4b313a4525

 

ABSTRACT: In the past years, six monogenic forms of Parkinson disease have clearly been associated with this movement disorder. The most frequent forms are LRRK2- and Parkin-associated Parkinson disease. Currently, a genetic diagnosis does not change the therapy, the genes involved in genetic Parkinson disease help to understand the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease. Beside the overview of the molecular-genetic basis, we give a review about genetic testing, pharmacological and other multidisciplinary treatment options.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Earhart, G.M.

Effects of dance on movement control in Parkinson's disease: A comparison of Argentine tango and American ballroom

(2009) Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 41 (6), pp. 475-481. Cited 119 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-66349095776&doi=10.2340%2f16501977-0362&partnerID=40&md5=6b2e853c5de4c8dd1f10b909d9cb64f6

 

DOI: 10.2340/16501977-0362

ABSTRACT: Objective: The basal ganglia may be selectively activated during rhythmic, metered movement such as tango dancing, which may improve motor control in individuals with Parkinson's disease. Other partner dances may be more suitable and preferable for those with Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of tango, waltz/foxtrot and no intervention on functional motor control in individuals with Parkinson's disease. Design: This study employed a randomized, between-subject, prospective, repeated measures design. Subjects/patients: Fifty-eight people with mild-moderate Parkinson's disease participated. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to tango, waltz/foxtrot or no intervention (control) groups. Those in the dance groups attended 1-h classes twice a week, completing 20 lessons in 13 weeks. Balance, functional mobility, forward and backward walking were evaluated before and after the intervention. Results: Both dance groups improved more than the control group, which did not improve. The tango and waltz/foxtrot groups improved significantly on the Berg Balance Scale, 6-minute walk distance, and backward stride length. The tango group improved as much or more than those in the waltz/foxtrot group on several measures. Conclusion: Tango may target deficits associated with Parkinson's disease more than waltz/foxtrot, but both dances may benefit balance and locomotion. © 2009 The Authors.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Young-Mason, J.

Music and dance bring hope to those with parkinson disease

(2009) Clinical Nurse Specialist, 23 (2), pp. 113-114. Cited 1 time.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-65449117673&doi=10.1097%2fNUR.0b013e3181990e88&partnerID=40&md5=da29b4cba342ec53da7e162cb8a50ea3

 

DOI: 10.1097/NUR.0b013e3181990e88

DOCUMENT TYPE: Short Survey

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Brown, S., Parsons, L.M.

The neuroscience of dance

(2008) Scientific American, 299 (1), pp. 78-83. Cited 31 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-49249101964&partnerID=40&md5=9a688785dcf9474914f07b4fd81c89dc

 

DOCUMENT TYPE: Short Survey

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Paulmann, S., Pell, M.D., Kotz, S.A.

Functional contributions of the basal ganglia to emotional prosody: Evidence from ERPs

(2008) Brain Research, 1217, pp. 171-178. Cited 31 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-45449120579&doi=10.1016%2fj.brainres.2008.04.032&partnerID=40&md5=c12b79b3acfea4e93f782b7c64dbb8a2

 

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2008.04.032

ABSTRACT: The basal ganglia (BG) have been functionally linked to emotional processing [Pell, M.D., Leonard, C.L., 2003. Processing emotional tone form speech in Parkinson's Disease: a role for the basal ganglia. Cogn. Affec. Behav. Neurosci. 3, 275-288; Pell, M.D., 2006. Cerebral mechanisms for understanding emotional prosody in speech. Brain Lang. 97 (2), 221-234]. However, few studies have tried to specify the precise role of the BG during emotional prosodic processing. Therefore, the current study examined deviance detection in healthy listeners and patients with left focal BG lesions during implicit emotional prosodic processing in an event-related brain potential (ERP)-experiment. In order to compare these ERP responses with explicit judgments of emotional prosody, the same participants were tested in a follow-up recognition task. As previously reported [Kotz, S.A., Paulmann, S., 2007. When emotional prosody and semantics dance cheek to cheek: ERP evidence. Brain Res. 1151, 107-118; Paulmann, S. & Kotz, S.A., 2008. An ERP investigation on the temporal dynamics of emotional prosody and emotional semantics in pseudo- and lexical sentence context. Brain Lang. 105, 59-69], deviance of prosodic expectancy elicits a right lateralized positive ERP component in healthy listeners. Here we report a similar positive ERP correlate in BG-patients and healthy controls. In contrast, BG-patients are significantly impaired in explicit recognition of emotional prosody when compared to healthy controls. The current data serve as first evidence that focal lesions in left BG do not necessarily affect implicit emotional prosodic processing but evaluative emotional prosodic processes as demonstrated in the recognition task. The results suggest that the BG may not play a mandatory role in implicit emotional prosodic processing. Rather, executive processes underlying the recognition task may be dysfunctional during emotional prosodic processing. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Holm, R.P., Peterson, J.R.

Moving to the sound of music.

(2008) South Dakota medicine : the journal of the South Dakota State Medical Association, 61 (5), p. 189.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-52449084409&partnerID=40&md5=a0384b2595f261530caafeb20ced2775

 

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Westheimer, O.

Why dance for Parkinson's disease

(2008) Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, 24 (2), pp. 127-140. Cited 26 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-44249116228&doi=10.1097%2f01.TGR.0000318900.95313.af&partnerID=40&md5=f43de73cd4c38f6cc90d106c23325fb4

 

DOI: 10.1097/01.TGR.0000318900.95313.af

ABSTRACT: Brooklyn Parkinson Group (BPG) in collaboration with Mark Morris Dance Group (MMDG), a renowned modern dance company, developed dance classes for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), friends, and family. In 5 years, classes have increased from 2 to 9 participants once a month, to weekly classes of 20 to over 30 participants. Professional dancers teach the classes in a large dance studio with live piano accompaniment. This article explains the rationale of dance for PD, describes teaching methods, and includes participants' observations. Perceived benefits noted by 15 participants with PD to a validated questionnaire are discussed. © 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Review

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Kantorovich, S., Earhart, G.M.

A study on the effects of argentine tango as a form of partnered dance for those with Parkinson Disease and the healthy elderly

(2007) American Journal of Dance Therapy, 29 (2), pp. 109-127. Cited 45 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-35648950453&doi=10.1007%2fs10465-007-9039-2&partnerID=40&md5=ab9cbbf72b1053a52174424bd9a23113

 

DOI: 10.1007/s10465-007-9039-2

ABSTRACT: Falls are the leading cause of injury deaths in older adults (Murphy 2000), and they can lead to fear of falling, reduced quality of life, withdrawal from activities, and injury. Changes in joint ranges of motion, strength, sensory processing, and sensorimotor integration all contribute to reduced balance stability with increasing age and these changes are paralleled in those with Parkinson Disease (PD). Interventions, such as traditional exercises tailored specifically for seniors and/or individuals with PD, have addressed balance and gait difficulties in an attempt to reduce fall rates with mixed, undocumented results. Argentine tango dancing has recently emerged as a promising non-traditional approach to ameliorating balance and gait problems among elderly individuals. The goal of this study was to determine whether the functional mobility benefits noted in elders following a tango dancing program might also extend to older individuals with PD. We compared the effects of tango to those of traditional exercise on functional mobility in individuals with and without PD. We predicted that the functional mobility and quality of life gains noted with Argentine tango would be greater than those noted with traditional strength/flexibility exercise. Thirty-eight subjects (19 control and 19 with PD) were assigned to 20 hour-long exercise or tango classes that were completed within 13 weeks. Although all groups showed gains in certain measures, only the Parkinson Tango group improved on all measures of balance, falls and gait. Moreover, upon terminating the program the Parkinson Tango group was more confident about balance than the Parkinson Exercise group. In psychosocial terms, both groups largely enjoyed their experiences because the classes fostered community involvement and became a source of social support for the members. Our results suggest that Argentine tango is an appropriate, enjoyable, and beneficial activity for the healthy elderly and those with PD and that tango may convey benefits not obtained with a more traditional exercise program. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Hackney, M.E., Kantorovich, S., Levin, R., Earhart, G.M.

Effects of tango on functional mobility in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study.

(2007) Journal of neurologic physical therapy : JNPT, 31 (4), pp. 173-179. Cited 102 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-41949088159&partnerID=40&md5=774dab3420d063a6f10bfd0d32af3d2c

 

ABSTRACT: Recent research has shown that dance, specifically tango, may be an appropriate and effective strategy for ameliorating functional mobility deficits in people who are frail and elderly. Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience declines in functional mobility that may be even more pronounced than those experienced by frail elderly individuals without PD. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two movement programs: tango classes or exercise classes. Nineteen subjects with PD were randomly assigned to a tango group or a group exercise class representative of the current classes offered in our geographical area for individuals with PD. Subjects completed a total of 20 tango or exercise classes and were evaluated the week before and the week following the intervention. Both groups showed significant improvements in overall Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score and nonsignificant improvements in self-reported Freezing of Gait. In addition, the tango group showed significant improvements on the Berg Balance Scale. The exercise group did not improve on this measure. Finally, the tango group showed a trend toward improvement on the Timed Up and Go test that was not observed in the exercise group. Future studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm and extend our observation that tango may be an effective intervention to target functional mobility deficits in individuals with PD.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Toste, T., Festas, M.J., Festas, C.

Physical therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease [Tratamento fisiatrico na doenca de Parkinson]

(1999) Arquivos de Fisiatria e Doencas Osteo-Articulares, 6 (3), pp. 103-106.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-0032703706&partnerID=40&md5=504b8d07dd82a9389fb4c47edccafe01

 

ABSTRACT: The authors propose quantified the efficacy of Fisiatric treatment program in patients with Parkinso's disease witch are examined at Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department since 1993. The population is 36 patients living near Hospital de S. Joao. In Stage II/III of Hoehn and Yahr classification. The protocol treatment's cinesiterapy class that include relaxation, active exercises of lim and back, postural exercises, coordination exercises and logopaedics activities such dance. The final functional results are animators.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Westbrook, B.K., McKibben, H.

Dance/movement therapy with groups of outpatients with Parkinson's disease

(1989) American Journal of Dance Therapy, 11 (1), pp. 27-38. Cited 26 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-0009918790&doi=10.1007%2fBF00844264&partnerID=40&md5=36e9596ac6c3d594ce140676086113cc

 

DOI: 10.1007/BF00844264

ABSTRACT: The treatment of medical and neurological illness is complicated by emotional factors. Dance/movement therapy is of potential benefit in such circumstances. The specific hypothesis was that dance/movement therapy would be more effective than exercise in the outpatient treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease. In a group setting, the effects of six weekly dance/movement therapy sessions on the neurological and emotional status of Parkinsonian patients were examined. A six week period of an ongoing exercise group was used in a crossover design as a control. Improvements in movement initiation were seen during the one-hour dance/movement therapy sessions, but not during the exercise groups. Although subjective improvements in mood were also apparent in the dance/movement therapy group, no statistically significant improvement in mild depressive symptoms could be documented. These results suggest that dance/movement therapy is useful as an additional approach in the treatment of Parkinson's disease patients. © 1989 American Dance Therapy Association.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

Metcalf, J.A., Watson, H.K., Matthews, R.G., Guynn, C.H.

ECG effects of aerobic dance. A study of five exercise-conditioned young women

(1981) Postgraduate Medicine, 70 (2), pp. 219-223. Cited 7 times.

https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-0019861470&partnerID=40&md5=03d0f50ddbb3a1e073a546066251fc49

 

ABSTRACT: Monitoring of the heart rate of five healthy well-conditioned women during an aerobic dance routine showed that maximum rates were within acceptable limits for exercise tachycardia except in one subject, who had paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia that subsequently converted to sinus tachycardia. Thus, although aerobic dance seems a benign form of exercise, it can be intense enough to trigger dysrhythmias. Before recommending or approving it for any patient, the physician should taken into consideration the person's age, health, and physical fitness level.

DOCUMENT TYPE: Article

SOURCE: Scopus

 

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